ARCHIVED: Schroeder, Boucher and Jaszi to Debate Information Access

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April 2, 1999


The continued availability of free information on the internet will be among the topics debated by Rep. Rick Boucher (D-Va) and former Rep. Patricia Schroeder, now President and Chief Executive Officer of the Association of American Publishers, during the Second Plenary Session of the 92nd Annual Meeting of the American Association of Law Libraries in Washington, D.C., July 17-22, 1999. Professor Peter Jaszi of the Washington College of Law of American University and a founder of the Digital Future Coalition will join Ms. Schroeder and Rep. Boucher at this debate which will focus on copyright, database protection and similar issues.

April 2, 1999 The continued availability of free information on the internet will be among the topics debated by Rep. Rick Boucher (D-Va) and former Rep. Patricia Schroeder, now President and Chief Executive Officer of the Association of American Publishers, during the Second Plenary Session of the . Professor Peter Jaszi of the Washington College of Law of American University and a founder of the Digital Future Coalition will join Ms. Schroeder and Rep. Boucher at this debate which will focus on copyright, database protection and similar issues.

The speakers represent widely different perspectives. Ms. Schroeder supports AAP’s stated goal of nurturing "creativity by protecting and strengthening intellectual property rights." Congressman Boucher supports a balance between copyright owners and users in the digital age and has introduced legislation to accomplish that goal. Professor Jaszi’s argues that some attempts to update copyright laws are "an assault on the whole notion of the public domain." Moderated by Bob Oakley, AALL Washington Affairs Representative and Professor of Law at Georgetown University School of Law, the debate promises will be a stimulating discussion of the public’s access to information, one of the most vital issues facing law libraries in the information age.

The American Association of Law Libraries was founded in 1906 to promote and enhance the value of law libraries to the legal and public communities, to foster the profession of librarianship, and to provide leadership in the field of legal information. Today, with over 4,800 members, the Association represents law librarians and related professionals who are affiliated with a wide range of institutions: law firms; law schools; corporate legal departments; courts; and local, state and federal government agencies.