AALL Spectrum Blog

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The AALL Spectrum® Blog is published by the American Association of Law Libraries. Submissions from AALL members and other members of the legal community are highly encouraged. Opinions and editorial views expressed are those of the authors and do not represent the official position of AALL. AALL does not assume any responsibility for statements advanced by contributors. The previous Spectrum Blog was located at aallspectrum.wordpress.com.
5/30/2013 12:15:16 PM

The June Issue of Spectrum is Now Available on AALLNET

We hope you enjoy the latest issue of Spectrum and encourage you to share your thoughts and feedback using the "comments" box below!

Public Relations: Outstanding! 47 Ways to Make Your Organization Exceptional
This resource provides simple strategies to improve customer service and more
By Joy M. Shoemaker

See You in Seattle!
Counting down to AALL's 106th Annual Meeting

Local Advocacy Networks
Adopting UELMA in your state and how you can help
By Catherine M. Dunn

RLLL Mobile Turns One
Reflections on how we developed a library mobile site from the ground up
By Catherine A. Lemmer and Hannah Alcasid

Authenticating the "John Hancock" of Online Primary Legal Materials
The technical and policy concerns at play
By Anna Russell and Jane Larrington

Digging in to Patron Data
What I learned from the law school "facebook"
By Sarah E. Ryan

Recognizing the Outstanding
Carolyn P. Ahearn and Judy Meadows receive the 2013 Marian Gould Gallagher Award
By Elizabeth L. Moore

Going Green with Carpooling
Setting up a carpooling program at your institution
By Emily Marcum

Showcasing Art in the Law Library
A county law library in Pennsylvania launches its art program
By Barbara Pasqua

A Valuable Contribution to Legal Literature
AALL names its 2013 Joseph L. Andrews Bibliographical Award winner
By Pauline Aranas

Frank Sinatra Never Branded Himself a "Ninja"
Some thoughts on informality in digital interactions
By Megan Wiseman

Introducing the Hall of Fame Class of 2013
AALL honors Brecht, Spinelli, Todd, and Wright
By Frank G. Houdek

From the Editor
Lost Days
By Mark E. Estes

From the President
Rethinking our Future
By Jean M. Wenger

Washington Brief
See You in Seattle! A Guide to Public Policy Programs at the 2013 Annual Meeting
By Emily Feltren

The Reference Desk
I coordinate the training for new associates at a law firm, and I'm appalled when I see someone taking a call or having a side conversation when I'm talking with them or catch them texting during a training session. I'm afraid that one of them will do the same thing when they're in a shareholder's office or with a client. Doesn't anyone appreciate good manners anymore?
By Susan Catterall

Member to Member
What has been your favorite vacation?

Stu's Views

Views from You
Views of the remodeled Rare Book and Special Collections Room at Taggart Law Library, Ohio Northern University, Ada

Posted By Ashley St. John at 5/30/2013 12:15:16 PM  0 Comments
TOPICS: spectrum
5/20/2013 12:51:50 AM

Book Review: Picture Business Strategy

Christine Chopyak, Picture Your Business Strategy: Transform Decisions with the Power of Visuals.
McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing. ISBN: 9780071815024;  Hardcover $27, 135 pages.

(Review based on an uncorrected proof.)

If you need convincing that storytelling – both orally and graphically can improve the decision-making process, then this book fills that need. The book includes an extensive bibliography, with many of print titles available on the web. Not a typical law library book unless your organization is preparing for some business strategy planning, it is still be an important read for library leaders who seeking to improve the planning process.

An enjoyable read, this book nonetheless disappointed me because I expected greater emphasis on visuals, especially how to select the most appropriate graphic images to aid in the decision-making process. Chopyak does build a good case for the power of storytelling and images to help everyone to both understand the business plan and to stay on the plan.

Mark Estes is the Law Library Director of the Alameda County Law Library

Posted By Mark Estes at 5/20/2013 12:51:50 AM  0 Comments
5/10/2013 3:59:27 PM

Book Review: Global Environmental Governance: Law and Regulation for the 21st Century

Louis J. KotzÉ, Global Environmental Governance: Law and Regulation for the 21st Century (2013). Edward Elgar Publishing. ISBN: 978-1-78100-252-0; Hardcover $175.00, 344 pages.

In today’s society, examples abound regarding how interconnected the world has become.  However, our oldest and most universal unifying point is undeniably the natural environment. Within this context, Global Environmental Governance, authored by Louis J. Kotzé, an environmental lawyer and faculty of law at North-West University in South Africa, focuses on the interconnectivity of our environment and attempts to holistically define, frame and describe governance—a traditional social scientific concept—from an environmental legal perspective. Dense and descriptive, this text focuses primarily on exploring the theoretical underpinnings and conceptual framework of environmental governance—an all-inclusive term referring to the coexistent, overlapping and interactive layers of transnational environmental regulation by different actors.  As a theoretical work, while the contributions Kotzé makes to the governance discussion are considerable, for purposes of library acquisition, this text should be considered an optional purchase for most libraries and a recommended acquirement for those libraries with an environmental concentration.

Part of the New Horizons in Environmental Law Series, the strength of this work lies in in Kotzé’s thoughtful consideration of various aspects of this extra-legal topic.  The contents of the book include: an Introduction which provides basic history, concepts, and terminology; Chapter 2 includes a discussion of globalization; a literature review follows in Chapter 3; Chapter 4 examines how global governance manifests; while Chapter 5 analyzes the relationship between law and governance.  The second half of this book starts with Chapter 6 and discusses the unique phenomenon of global environmental governance; Chapter 7 provides a literature review for global environmental governance as a distinct category; Chapter 8 examines the relationship of environmental law and regulation with governance; and finally, in Chapter 9, the author concludes by providing a restructured view of global environmental governance. 

The largest criticism of the work is its circuitous organization as the chapter headings are redundant, unclear and not terribly helpful for navigating the text.  Moreover, the two sections of the book are not explicitly made clear from the Table of Contents, but only from a close reading of the Introduction. (p. 21-24).  Furthermore, the author’s writing style is thoughtful and has a tendency to ramble which may deter the casual reader.   However, the text is made more accessible with the inclusion of footnotes, an extensive bibliography, and an index.

Taryn L. Rucinski is an Environmental Law Librarian and Adjunct Professor at Pace Law School.

Posted By Taryn Rucinski at 5/10/2013 3:59:27 PM  0 Comments