Kansas SWALL/MAALL

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Exact times are subject to change in the final program.

A downloadable PDF is available here.

Thursday 11:45pm-1:15pm

Opening Luncheon

Thursday 1:30pm-2:30pm

"Say What???!! --- Professional librarians without a JD at the reference desk"
This program explores reference services provided to patrons at the reference desk, by non-reference librarians. An Access Services Librarian and a Technical Services Librarian will share how they became a part of the shared rotation for reference desk times with the JD librarians. Topics to be discussed include how non-reference librarians approach "the reference interview," handling various questions over the phone, and guiding and informing students and the public to the best methods and things to be careful of when using a law library. Can wearing different "hats" help or hinder reference services?

Presenters: Marcia Dority Baker, Assistant Professor of Law Library, Access Services Librarian, Schmid Law Library, University of Nebraska College of Law; Sandra Placzek, Associate Director, Schmid Law Library, University of Nebraska College of Law; Brian Striman, Head of Technical Services, Schmid Law Library, University of Nebraska College of Law.

Primary Legal Materials: Access, Preservation, Authentication, and Advocacy
Completing the AALL State Legal Inventory project for our MAALL and SWALL states was a considerable undertaking. We will “debrief” and discuss the challenges and accomplishments of the inventory project, including lessons learned, best practices, and future updating considerations. In light of the AALL project, we will also check in with the law.gov venture and see where the TALLO (Taking Academic Law Libraries Online) initiative is headed. The final segment of the program will highlight the work of the NCCUSL Drafting Committee on the Uniform Electronic Legal Material Act. Keith Ann Stiverson, the AALL observer to the NCCUSL Committee, will discuss the history of the new act and how MAALL/SWALL members can advocate for authentication of digital legal materials in their respective states.

Presenters: Matt Novak, Reference Librarian & Associate Professor of Law Library, Schmid Law Library, University of Nebraska College of Law; Rhonda Schwartz, Library Director & Assistant Professor of Law, Thormodsgard Law Library, University of North Dakota School of Law; Chris Steadham, Associate Director, Wheat Law Library, University of Kansas School of Law; and Keith Ann Stiverson, Library Director, Chicago-Kent College of Law.

The Future (of Web Development) is Now: improving Website access and usability through HTML5
Although HTML has been in continuous development since its creation in the early 1990s it has not undergone any fundamental revision since HTML4 became the standard in 1997. Recently, however, Web developers have been leading efforts to create a more interactive and more workable HTML standard. This new standard, known simply as HTML5, is slated for recommendation by 2014. And even though HTML5 is technically still under development, a number of its key features can capably be incorporated into current Web design. These features include new tag elements, multimedia support, interactive form inputs, mobile device integration, and more. This program will discuss the significance of HTML5, and will demonstrate how its new features can be used to enhance a library’s Website.

Presenter: Timothy Wilson, Electronic Resources Librarian, St. Mary’s University Law Library.

Thursday 2:30pm-3pm

Break in Exhibit Hall

Thursday 3pm-4pm

Why Can’t We Have Them at Hello? Overcoming Obstacles to Library Orientation for New Attorneys and Law Faculty Members
It can be a challenge to introduce new employees to the law library’s many resources, let alone help them remember this information at the point of need. From both a firm and academic perspective, this program explores strategies for initially reaching new attorneys and new law faculty during orientation and then building on this foundation to ensure an awareness of library services.

Presenters: Deborah Grimm, Library Research Manager, Husch Blackwell and Karen Wallace, Circulation/Reference Librarian, Drake Law Library.

At the Ballot Box and Beyond: Researching Election Law
This program will provide attendees with an overview of the most useful print resources for researching election law, including the topics of voters’ rights, campaign finance and election administration. The session will provide a brief introduction to major federal legislation concerning election law. Attendees will further become familiar the many electronic resources available for researching the law of elections, including online research guides, government and political organization websites, and blogs.

Presenters: Lisa A. Goodman, Head of Public Services, Dee J. Kelly Law Library, Texas Wesleyan University School of Law; Laura McKinnon, Public Services Librarian, Dee J. Kelly Law Library, Texas Wesleyan University School of Law

Technology Petting Zoo
The Technology Petting Zoo features a variety of gadgets of interest, including Smartphones, e-Readers, iPads, iPhones, Blackberrys, wireless devices, etc. Participants can check out these gadgets and how they work in a comfortable, non-threatening atmosphere. Each panelist will have 10 minutes to show their wares and then the round robin begins! Participants will see six different gadgets in 60 minutes.

Coordinator: Barbara Fullerton, Manager of Librarian Relations, Morningstar Document Research

AV/Room Needs: Each panelist will have their gadgets so no need for A/V or Computer Needs. We will need to set up the room in six different stations with a table and chairs for each gadget station. Outlets will be needed.

Thursday 4:15pm-5pm

“You have learned well, Grasshopper” - Mentoring and Preparing Students Interested in Careers in Law Librarianship
A panel discussion with four law librarians, who will share how and what he or she does to mentor students interested in law librarianship. The panel will talk about formal and informal mentoring, challenges and opportunities of mentoring, and employing students interested in law librarianship.

Presenters: Candle Wester-Mittan, Moderator, Access Services Librarian and Assistant Professor, Southern Illinois University School of Law Library; Douglas Lind, Director and Associate Professor of Law, Southern Illinois University School of Law Library; Sandra Placzek, Associate Director, Schmid Law Library, University of Nebraska College of Law; Cindy Shearrer, Associate Law Librarian for Patron Services, University of Missouri-Columbia Law Library

Dueling Platforms: Teaching Legal Research Amid Online Service Transitions
With the launch of WestlawNext and Lexis Advance those who teach legal research are confronted with the challenge of teaching two versions on the same online system simultaneously. Since both systems exist side-by-side one cannot always be sure which platform our students and practitioners will encounter. Adding to the challenge is the fact that the two platforms, in each system, do not yet contain identical information. This program is intended to highlight some of the challenges and benefits of dual platform presentation as well as to offer solutions to some of the challenges. Additionally the program will focus on features of the “new” and “old” systems that can be used to enhance the research learning experience.

Presenter: Therese A. Clarke Arado, Reference and Instructional Services Librarian, Associate Professor, Northern Illinois University College of Law Library

Watson, Answer Me This: Will You Make Librarians Obsolete or Can I Use Free and Open Source Software and Systems and Cloud Computing Tools to Ensure a Bright Future?
In February 2011 Watson, IBM’s “smart” computer defeated two former Jeopardy champions. While the application of the technology may support some legal research functions, the current state of the technology probably will not allow Watson to replace law librarians in the near future. Yet, given the economic realities of our firms and institutions, librarians do need to consider technologies that may reduce the considerable cost associated with discovering and maintaining access to legal information. Free and open source software and systems and cloud-based initiatives may provide innovative approaches librarians should consider. Covering topics similar to an column by the same name published in the Summer 2011 Law Library Journal, this program will address the future of use of open source and cloud computing tools in law libraries. Specific attention will be given to the use of open source integrated library systems and OCLCs Web Scale Management, a cloud computing option being adopted by libraries to operate without the necessity of a locally maintained ILS systems. In addition to speaking to the technological aspects of these tools, the program will also address some of the management aspects involved adoption and implementation of these tools.

Presenters: Darla Jackson, Associate Director, Oklahoma City University Law Library and Jenny Watson, Asst. Circulation Librarian, Oklahoma City University Law Library

Thursday 5:00pm-6:00pm

Committee meetings

Thursday 6:00 pm-6:45pm

Cocktails in the Exhibit Hall

Thursday 6:45pm

Dinner and Marianne Wesson

Friday 8am-9:30am

Breakfast and Business Meetings

Friday 9:45am-10:45am

Navigating your Way through Legislative Research-A Six State Survey, Part I
Legislative history can be challenging especially at the state level because states have their own legislative practices with details mostly unknown to people from out-of-state. The legislative documents created may vary widely and are not always available. This program will highlight the unique features of legislative practices in six states (Arizona, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas) and the different sources of legislative research available. Attendees will gain a greater understanding of the legislative process, documents created and their availability, and how to locate these documents for each state.

Presenters: Chris Dykes, Co-Coordinator, Reference/Research Librarian, O’Quinn Law Library, University of Houston Law Center; Emily Lawson, Co-Coordinator, Moderator & Speaker, Reference/Research Librarian, O’Quinn Law Library, University of Houston Law Center (Texas); Joseph Custer, Director, Omer Poos Law Library & Assistant Professor of Law, Saint Louis University School of Law (Missouri); Katy Stein, Faculty Services Librarian/Assistant Professor, St. Mary’s University School of Law, Sarita Kennedy East Law Library (Arizona); Faye Hadley, Native American Resources/Reference Law Librarian, University of Tulsa College of Law, Mabee Legal Information Center (Oklahoma), Nolan Wright, Reference Librarian and Assistant Professor, Southern Illinois University School of Law Library, (Illinois) and TBA (Iowa)

Roundtable Discussions for State, Court, and County Law Librarians & Law Firm Law Librarians This session will provide two roundtable discussion venues: one for state, court, and county law librarians and one for law firm law librarians. Moderators will begin the discussions. Come join us for a lively discussion on topics important to our libraries!

Moderators: Kerry Altenbernd (Mr.), Law Librarian, Douglas County Law Library, Judicial and Law Enforcement Center and TBA

Supply vs Demand: the Legal and Ethical Issues in Organ Donation in the United States
The number of patients on the waiting list for an organ transplant far exceeds the number of available organs. The increasing imbalance of supply and demand has raises the issues of how to establish criteria for fairly determining who among all those waiting should receive an available organ as well developing means to increase the number of organ donors. The program will provide a brief history of the milestones in organ donation, review current criteria for recipients, and evaluate proposals for increasing the number of potential donors from both legal and bioethical perspectives.

Presenters: Elizabeth Schneider (retired librarian of Plattner, Schneidman & Schnieder), and TBA from the Midwest Transplant Network

Friday 11am-12pm

Navigating your Way through Legislative Research-A Six State Survey, Part II
Legislative history can be challenging especially at the state level because states have their own legislative practices with details mostly unknown to people from out-of-state. The legislative documents created may vary widely and are not always available. This program will highlight the unique features of legislative practices in six states (Arizona, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas) and the different sources of legislative research available. Attendees will gain a greater understanding of the legislative process, documents created and their availability, and how to locate these documents for each state.

Presenters: Chris Dykes, Co-Coordinator, Reference/Research Librarian, O’Quinn Law Library, University of Houston Law Center; Emily Lawson, Co-Coordinator, Moderator & Speaker, Reference/Research Librarian, O’Quinn Law Library, University of Houston Law Center (Texas); Joseph Custer, Director, Omer Poos Law Library & Assistant Professor of Law, Saint Louis University School of Law (Missouri); Katy Stein, Faculty Services Librarian/Assistant Professor, St. Mary’s University School of Law, Sarita Kennedy East Law Library (Arizona); Faye Hadley, Native American Resources/Reference Law Librarian, University of Tulsa College of Law, Mabee Legal Information Center (Oklahoma), Nolan Wright, Reference Librarian and Assistant Professor, Southern Illinois University School of Law Library, (Illinois) and TBA (Iowa)

Campus Copyright Support Team: A Vehicle for Law Libraries to Work with Campus Libraries to Facilitate Copyright Compliance
Increased use of the Internet in teaching + rapid development of technology that enables use and manipulation of content + the nuances of current copyright law = copyright issues in academia that are growing in number and complexity. The UMKC University Libraries has created a Copyright Support Team, a multidisciplinary collaboration of university librarians, including law librarians, who help faculty navigate such issues in a low budget yet effective way. This session will describe the program’s genesis, the resources employed, how the team built campus recognition, how copyright questions are handled, and the team’s deliberations concerning institutional copyright policy.

Presenters: Paul D. Callister, Director of the Leon E. Bloch Law Library & Professor of Law, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law; Laura Gayle Green, Head, Music/Media Library, Miller Nichols Library, University of Missouri-Kansas City; Kathleen Hall, Director of Public Services, Leon E. Bloch Law Library, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law

Managing the Flow of Information into Your Office: Juggling Social Media, Productivity, and Sanity
Information overload has long been a problem for librarians. But with the addition of social media to the roles of many librarians, information overload just got exponentially worse. If we are constantly chasing rabbit trails, learning new information and connecting with patrons and colleagues, how can we get any work done? This session will examine the issues facing librarians, discuss the myth of multitasking, examine the value of focus and ways to protect it, and provide tools to help bring more manageability and sanity back into a librarian’s workday.

Presenters: Cindy Bassett, University of Missouri School of Law Library, Electronic Services Librarian and Resa Kerns, University of Missouri School of Law Library, Associate Law Librarian for Web and Educational Technologies

Friday 12:00pm-1:30pm

Lunch and Stephen Ramsay

Friday 1:45pm-2:15pm

Tips, Quips, and Acting – In the Library
This short program will be an interactive discussion about things to do in the library to keep you fresh and engaged in your job duties. It will also discuss the realities of how we sometimes “act” as actors to get through tough situations in the workplace. Strange patrons are people we often have to put on our acting hats for in order to work through a difficult reference interview. The program is intended to help people think about the way we use humor, and creative strategies to make work, less like work, when needed.

Presenters: Joyce A. McCray Pearson, Director and Associate Professor of Law, The University of Kansas School of Law, Wheat Law Library, Chris Steadham, Associate Director, The University of Kansas School of Law, Wheat Law Library, Pam Tull, Head of Public Services, The University of Kansas School of Law, Wheat Law Library and Blake Wilson, Head of Instruction and Research Services, The University of Kansas School of Law, Wheat Law Library

What’s Next Gen X? A discussion of the book by Tamara Erickson.
Tamara Erickson’s examination of the socio-economic status of the age group known as “Generation X” takes us beyond the stereotypes of “slacker” and “whiner” and helps us question the demographic and economic mythologies that surround what some have called the “baby bust.” As Generation X ages and enters what are typically the peak earning years for professionals, the members of this group feel squeezed between Boomers who are retiring later (for a variety of reasons) and Generation Y (a larger demographic group with youth on its side) encroaching on traditional Gen X turf. This short program will be a spirited discussion of the economic and workplace dynamics described by Erickson as well as the strategies she suggests for Gen Xers to achieve what they want in work and life. We will examine what value these strategies may have for Gen Y and Millennials as well. The impact of current economic issues on Erickson’s strategies will also be factored into the discussion.

Program participants are asked to read Erickson’s book before attending the session but those who have not read the book would be welcome to share life experiences. All generations (Greatest, Boomer, X, and Y) are welcome at the session.

Presenters: Jennifer Laws, U.S. Courts Librarian at San Antonio, Texas and Michelle Rigual, Law Library Director and Associate Professor of Law, Dee J. Kelly Law Library, Texas Wesleyan School of Law

Adobe Connect
A short demonstration of Adobe Connect, an enterprise web conferencing solution for online meetings, eLearning, and webinars used by leading corporations and government agencies. Based on ubiquitous Adobe Flash technology, it enables the rapid creation of online training and delivery of virtual classes in real time, on demand or offline.

Presenter: Glen McBeth, Instructional Technology Librarian, Washburn University School of LawJ

Friday 2:30pm-3:15pm

The Bluebook, 19th ed.: Changes Every Legal Researcher Should Know
Some people hate The Bluebook; most people despise it. Unfortunately, many federal and state courts require use of The Bluebook. Despite our misgivings, a new, revised edition of The Bluebook is published approximately every five years. The good news: We won’t have to worry about a new edition until 2015. The bad news: the 19th edition has been with us since mid-2010 and it contains literally hundreds of changes. This interactive program will highlight some of the more important changes. Feel free to bring your Bluebook questions.

Presenter: Dan Baker, Reference/Research Librarian, University of Houston Law Center, O’Quinn Law Library

What is the Climate of your Law Library?
Climate surveys are currently being touted in MBA programs and they involve the process of quantifying the “culture” of an organization by measuring the internal climate, or general feel of how people view their work, and the workplace. The types of issues covered in a climate survey may include (amongst others): Physical work environment, Enjoyment of work, Rewards and recognition, Management practices, Leadership, including vision, Understanding of the organization, Opportunities to develop, Marketing possibilities, Career progression and Client focus of the organization. Director Custer discusses a climate survey he conducted when he arrived as the new Director of the law library at the Saint Louis University Law School. Participants will find out what a climate survey is and whether it makes sense for their particular law library.

Presenter: Joe Custer Assistant Prof & Director, Omer Poos Law Library, Saint Louis University School of Law

Friday 3:30

Leave for tours and reception at Dole Institute of Politic, followed by Friday evening Dine Arounds in Downtown Lawrence

Saturday 8am-9am

Breakfast at the Wheat Law Library with tours of the library.

Saturday 9am-9:45am

Films, Free-Staters, and Fauvists: Non-traditional methods the Douglas County Law Library uses to connect with its wider community.
The Douglas County Law Library uses a number of methods not usually associated with law libraries to market itself to the wider community beyond its usual patron base. This program will discuss some of these, including its Reels of Justice Film Series and special content in its on-line newsletter. Information will be presented on how these were developed and how other law libraries can develop similar methods.

Presenter: Kerry Altenbernd (Mr.), Law Librarian, Douglas County Law Library, Judicial and Law Enforcement Center

Unconference: Marketing Round-Up: What Works (Or Doesn’t) in Marketing Your Library
In our dreams as young librarians, few of us ever picture ourselves as marketers. But demonstrating what we have to offer, whether to a reluctant 1L, an avid pro-se, a taciturn judge, or an over-worked associate, is a task we all share. This year we are opening a space to have an in-depth (or really shallow if you prefer!) conversation about marketing – what works and what doesn’t. We want to hear what you have tried, what you have heard about and want to know if someone else has tried, and anything else we can dream up in our collective consciousness to showcase our resources.

What is an Unconference, you ask? For us, it is a time and a place and a topic. You come and bring your thoughts and questions with you. The conversation will arise and move as dictated by the participants. There is no maven. No guru. There are some rules, though.

  1. Whoever comes is the right person.
  2. Whatever happens is the only thing that could have.
  3. Whenever it starts is the right time.
  4. When it's over, it's over.
So, it will be just us, seeing what we can learn from each other. If you find you aren’t interested, you can leave. We think you’ll want to stay.

Moderator: Cindy Bassett, Electronic Services Librarian, University of Missouri Law Library

Saturday 10am-11am

Library Digitization: The St. Louis Freedom Suits Legal Encoding Project
In 2009 the Washington University Libraries, were awarded a grant to digitize, transcribe, and encode approximately 300 freedom suits from the St. Louis Circuit Court Records Project (http://www.stlcourtrecords.wustl.edu/) (of which Dred Scott is a part). Although the suits had previously been imaged, they were not useful to many scholars because they were available only as difficult to read images. The nearly complete project included developing extensions to the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) for encoding legal documents to reflect legal function, genres, and roles. The presenters include members of the law library and a member from the Digital Library Services who will discuss the project and all that it involved.

Presenters: Aris Woodham, Director of Web Services, Washington University School of Law; Hyla Bondareff, Electronic Resources Librarian Washington University School of Law; Erika Cohn, Digital Access Librarian Washington University

Unconference: Marketing Round-Up: What Works (Or Doesn’t) in Marketing Your Library
In our dreams as young librarians, few of us ever picture ourselves as marketers. But demonstrating what we have to offer, whether to a reluctant 1L, an avid pro-se, a taciturn judge, or an over-worked associate, is a task we all share. This year we are opening a space to have an in-depth (or really shallow if you prefer!) conversation about marketing – what works and what doesn’t. We want to hear what you have tried, what you have heard about and want to know if someone else has tried, and anything else we can dream up in our collective consciousness to showcase our resources.

What is an Unconference, you ask? For us, it is a time and a place and a topic. You come and bring your thoughts and questions with you. The conversation will arise and move as dictated by the participants. There is no maven. No guru. There are some rules, though.

  1. Whoever comes is the right person.
  2. Whatever happens is the only thing that could have.
  3. Whenever it starts is the right time.
  4. When it's over, it's over.
So, it will be just us, seeing what we can learn from each other. If you find you aren’t interested, you can leave. We think you’ll want to stay.

Moderator: Cindy Bassett, Electronic Services Librarian, University of Missouri Law Library

Saturday 11am

Box lunch and return to hotel.
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