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South Florida Association of Law Libraries


Newsletter

Winter 2000

A Quarterly publication of the South Florida Association of Law Librarians.
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President's MessageQuill

Terry Seale
Greenberg Traurig

Welcome to the wonderful world of South Florida in winter! There are many things to delight.

We’re planning our annual holiday party for Thursday, December 14th, at 6:30 p.m. at Los Ranchos of Bayside Restaurant, 401 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida. The cost is $25.00 and includes:

  • A glass of wine or soft drink
  • House salad and garlic bread
  • Choice of entree from the following:
    • Baby Churrasco
    • Red Snapper Filet Grilled
    • Fajitas (Beef or Chicken)
    • Boneless Breast of Chicken
  • White Rice or Gallo Pinto, French Fries or Plantains
  • Choice of dessert including:
    • Tres Leches
    • Flan
    • Pio V
    • Ice Cream Truffles
  • Coffee or Hot Tea
Happy Holidays

If you plan to attend, please contact Janet Reinke by December 11th at (305) 284-4264.

The cost is $25.00. Please make checks payable to SFALL and send to Monica Wilson, Director of Library Services, Steel Hector & Davis, 200 South Biscayne Blvd, 42nd Floor, Miami, FL 33131, (305) 577-2958.

Questions or need directions? Click here.

We look forward to seeing you there. Enjoy the holidays!

Terry

Election Internet Sites of Interest

A Researchers’ Guide to the Journal of the Florida House of Representatives and the Journal of the Florida Senate

Sarah Tabor
Nova Southeastern University, Shepard Broad Law Center

The Journals of the Florida House and Senate began in 1965. Generally two volumes appear each year. But be aware that the Session begin and end dates may consume multiple volumes. Special sessions can require an additional volume, or they may appear within regular session year volumes.

Usually the Organization Session begins each Session volume. On pages following colored paper dividers, you will find the names and photos of members of the Organization Session as well as the number and type of session.

Actions on House Bills are numerical by date with a summary of committee actions at the end of each day. If you have a date, search for a bill on the date; otherwise, consult Session indexes. In all bills, words with a straight line across them indicate these words were stricken from the bills. Words in italics are added words to the bills.

There are subject indexes to Senate and House Bills, Resolutions and Memorials. The subject matter of each is indexed and cross indexed in an alphabetical arrangement, using keywords related closely to the subject matter. This is followed by the number of the bill, resolution, or memorial.

In the Senate Journals, both House and Senate Bills are indexed, and the house of origin is identified by the letter preceding each bill: S-Senate; H-House. Some House bills here have not necessarily been received by the Senate; however, they are indexed for the researcher interested in a particular subject matter. Boldfaced bill numbers passed both houses. Adopted one-house resolutions also are boldfaced. Find the bill number and then turn to the Numerical Index of Senate Bills, Resolutions, and Memorials. At this site, you will find all legislation, as introduced by the member, in numerical order. Opposite each bill number is a brief explanation of the subject matter, the name of introducer or introducers, the page number where reference to the bill involved appears in the Journal, and the final status of the bill.

It is possible to trace the entire progress of legislation, from introduction to passage, step by step, as it is recorded on the various pages of the Senate Journal by looking up the bill number on the pages referred to. There is an Index to Senate Bills, Resolutions and Memorial appearing in the House Journal. To trace the course of a bill, resolution or memorial originating and passed by the Senate and sent to the House for action in the House Journal, refer to the Journal of the House and to the special numerical index listing Senate bills, resolutions, and memorials appearing there. The same bill number follows the bill through both Senate and House. A brief explanation of the subject matter of the bill, resolution or memorial, and a list showing the introducers and page numbers in the House Journal where the Senate bill appears, make it possible to trace through the House Journal action on all Senate bills.

If you know the number of a bill, resolution or memorial, turn directly to the numerical index of the Senate or House Journal listing Senate bills.

If you need this information for the current year before the Journal volumes are assembled for publication, consult the Florida Legislature Regular Session. This publication is divided into separately published sections:

  • a daily legislative bill information Citator, which includes statistics as well as a breakdown of all bills by bill number, bill type, and actions, i.e., passed, died in committee, etc.;
  • Bill History, which contains separate sections for Senate and House bills, provides bill numbers and bill types, and names of sponsors, compares identical and similar bills, includes effective dates, and a brief description of bills and bill action history; and
  • Sponsor Report, which lists all bill numbers, prime and co-sponsored, by a legislative member or committee.

Another useful tool may be the Florida Session Law Reporter, which mirrors the Laws of Florida prior to publication. This publication includes:

  • Concise Subject Matter Index;
  • Tentative Table of Statutes;
  • Affected, Tracing Table;
  • Abridged Titles to the Session Laws; and
  • Text of Session Laws.

With this information, you can begin working with the Florida House and Senate Journals.

Presidential Election 2000

Lisa Smith-Butler
Nova Southeastern University, Shepard Broad Law Center

The 2000 Presidential Election provides numerous web sites to visit for information, legal research, and humor.

CNN at http://www.cnn.com/ and MSNBC at http://www.msnbc.com/ provide coverage of "breaking news," including polls, chat rooms, streaming video, and news articles. The New York Times at http://www.nyt.com/ provides access to news stories as well as its editorial opinions as does the Washington Post, which is available at http://www.washingtonpost.com/. South Florida’s Sun-Sentinel is at http://www.sun-sentinel.com/, while the Miami Herald is available at http://www.herald.com/.

Information about democracy, voting rights, and elections can also be located in a variety of places. The Center for Voting and Democracy provides information at its site at http://www.igc.apc.org/cvd while Common Cause can be found at http://www.commoncause.org/. Florida’s Secretary of State, Division of Elections, is at http://election.dos.state.fl.us/index.html. The Federal Election Commission can be accessed via http://www.fec.gov/ and the United States Electoral College is at http://www.naragov/fedreg/elctcoll/.

Primary sources of law include the U.S. Constitution and the United States Code as well as the Florida Constitution and Florida Statutes. The full text of the U.S. Constitution can be found at Cornell’s Legal Information Institute at http://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/, while the U.S.C. can be accessed at http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/. The full text of Florida’s constitutional and statutory provisions can be found at Online Sunshine at http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Welcome/index.cfm. Many cases, including pending petitions, motions, memorandums, and orders in the 2000 Election, can be found either at CNN’s Law Library at http://www.cnn.com/LAW/library/ or Findlaw at http://www.findlaw.com/legalnews/us/election/election2000.html.

On a lighter note, some web sites are providing comic relief. BET provides viewers with a Florida voting experience at http://www.bet.com/elections/florida_vote.html, while Onion.com at http://www.onion.com/ provides humorous news articles. Whatever your fancy, there is certain to be some site to delight or inform.

 

Interesting Books and Magazine Sites on the Internet

Billie Jo Kaufman
Nova Southeastern University, Shepard Broad Law Center

Many of us appreciate the convenience of purchasing books and related materials online. Ecommerce offers the security and ease to fill up a basket or shopping cart and receive delivery at your front door the next day. Several sites send advance notice emails to you when a favorite author has penned another best-seller. Some sites offer gift wrap as well as other personal shopping services.

My list includes old favorites, Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble, but it also introduces new sites such as Fatbrain.com and Magsnow.com. It’s a good idea to do cross site shopping to get the best price and services. With Ecommerce, the only thing missing is the overstuffed leather chair and the coffee latte.

A1 ( http://www.a1books.com) provides textbook listings for over 1,500 colleges nationwide.

Adventurous Traveler Bookstore ( http://www.adventuroustraveler.com) provides outdoor adventure and travel books, maps, videos, and CDs.

Alibris ( http://www.alibris.com) has rare and hard to find books.

Amazon.com ( http://www.amazon.com) offers an array of products, free electronic greeting cards, online auctions, millions of books, CDs, videos, DVDs, toys, games, and electronics.

Barnes and Noble ( http://www.barnesandnoble.com) is a widely known national retail bookstore that offers its comprehensive collection online. The search engine is easy to use.

Booksamillion.com ( http://www.booksamillion.com) is a huge online bookstore with weekly specials and specific links to interesting book sites.

BookCloseOuts.com ( http://www.bookcloseouts.com) provides older favorites at cheap prices. While you won’t find today’s best-sellers at this site, you can find favorite authors and/or books at great prices.

Fatbrain.com ( http://www.fatbrain.com) is where the IT professionals go for the newest and best technical books.

Half.com ( http://www.half.com) provides previously-owned books, movies, music, and games. You can also sell your items there.

Magazines.com ( http://www.magazines.com) allows you to buy or renew your favorite magazine subscriptions online.

MagsNow.com ( http://www.magsnow.com) is a single copy magazine site that offers current and back issue copies of magazines. You don’t have to subscribe to a magazine to use this site.

Powell’s Books ( http://www.powells.com) provides a large collection of new and used books on the Internet. Special discounts are available. Many rare books can be found at this site.

VarsityBooks.com ( http://www.varsitybooks.com) provides textbooks at up to 40% savings.

Enjoy searching and shopping!

 

Jobs

The Palm Beach Post Editorial Library has an immediate opening for a News Researcher. If you're looking for a challenging, stimulating workplace in which to showcase your research skills, look no further. We need someone who has a natural curiosity and passion for news and research. You love the information hunt and how it fits in the story. You also must have experience searching online databases, the Internet, and traditional library sources. Strengths and interest in database development, intranets, and web authoring tools, as well as experience with a variety of PC applications is a plus. In addition, there are responsibilities for the maintenance of our online reference collection catalog as well as collection development. Flexibility and availability to do what's needed when it's needed and a team-work ethic, with the ability to work closely with both newsroom and library teams is a must.

A bachelor’’s degree is required and an MLS is preferred. News or corporate library experience is a must. This is a Sunday through Thursday position with some evening hours. What we have to offer you:

  • Subscriptions to just about all the online services you'll ever need.
  • A challenging workplace, where you can learn and grow.
  • A highly competitive news environment.
  • A stimulating corporate culture where change is the norm, in a community that is culturally interesting and diverse.
  • Highly competitive salary and benefits.
  • The opportunity to live on (or at least hang out on) Clematis Street, which the New York Times called ``a thriving Euro-boulevard with outdoor cafes and a street fair every Thursday night.''
  • A county where you can shop Worth Avenue, canoe the Loxahatchee River, (Florida’’s only federally designated Wild and Scenic River), swim in the Atlantic before work, or enjoy a green market on Saturday mornings.

Interested applicants should apply with a resume and cover letter to:

Sammy Alzofon
Library Director
The Palm Beach Post
POB 24700
West Palm Beach FL 33416-4700
(561) 837-8409 - fax
salzofon@pbpost.com

Information for the Newsletter

Sfall Newsletter is the official publication of the South Florida Law Librarians Association. It is published quarterly and distributed free to all Sfall members. Editorial comments or submissions should be sent to:

Lisa Smith-Butler, Associate Law Library Director
Nova Southeastern University, Shepard Broad Law Center
Law Library & Technology Center
3305 College Ave.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33314
(954) 262-6215
954.262.3838 (F)
smith-butlerl@nsu.law.nova.edu

 


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