FCIL Newsletter, October 1995

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FCIL Newsletter / October 1995


REPORTS FROM PITTSBURGH: WORKING GROUPS

Asian Law

by Haibin Hu
College of William and Mary Law Library

The Asian Law Working Group meeting took place at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, July 18, 1995, at the Crawford Room, Pittsburgh Vista Hotel. Bill McCloy, University of Washington, Seattle, chaired the meeting. Present were: Dan Wade (Yale University), Joan Liu (New York University), Clement Lau (University of Baltimore), Mila Rush (University of Minnesota), Telle Zoller (University of Wisconsin -- Madison), Jonathan Franklin (University of Michigan), Dennis Sears (Brigham Young University), Lyonette Louis-Jacques (University of Chicago), Wei Luo (Southern Illinois University), Heija B. Ryoo (Southern Illinois University), Mon Yin Lung (University of Kansas), and Rebecca Jane Rungsang (Tilleke & Gibbins, Thailand). The meeting began with the participants introducing themselves and commenting on the Asian law collections at their respective libraries.

To proceed with business, Bill McCloy gave a brief report on recent activities regarding the Council on East Asian Libraries (CEAL) and the Committee on Research Materials for Southeast Asia (CORMOSEA). Bill serves as an executive member of CEAL, and attended a meeting of CEAL in April 1995. Bill expressed an willingness to share this information with anyone interested.

After Bill's remarks, the participants gave regional/country reports on their library's collections, activities, and concerns, which involved materials on South Asia, Southeast Asia, Central Asia, and East Asia. During such reports, Dan Wade mentioned that the Library of Congress had closed down its journal office for information collection in Islamabad, Pakistan. Jonathan Franklin stated that the University of Michigan Law Library was considering starting a collection of Indonesian law. Joan Liu related that the NYU Law Library might begin to collect Chinese law. Clement Lau said that the University of Baltimore Law Library might develop some Asian law collection. Rebacca Rungsang reported that her firm had opened up an office in Cambodia and that she would be happy to help law librarians with questions on Cambodian legal sources. Bill McCloy pointed out that the University of Washington Law Library had published the Index to Japanese Laws, and that his library was planing to set up a home page for Asia laws (Korea, China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong) on the Internet.

The working group meeting was concluded around 7 p.m.


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