2013 AALL Annual Meeting in Seattle

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2013 AALL Annual Meeting in Seattle, July 13-16

LHRB-SIS ACTIVITIES:

Morris L. Cohen Essay Presentation and Luncheon
  • Sunday, July 14, 12:30-1:45 p.m.
  • Winner: Sarah Levine-Gronningsater, PhD Candidate in American History at the University of Chicago, "Louis Napoleon's Secret Service: Gradual Emancipation, Antislavery Legal Culture, and the Origins of the Lemmon Slave Case (1852-60)"
  • Runner-up: Matthew Axtell, PhD Candidate in History at Princeton University, "Customs of the River: Legal Change and Shifting Hydrology in the 19-Century Steamboat Economy" (available on SSRN). Matthew presented his essay at the 2013 AALL Annual meeting in Seattle.  
LHRB Annual Business Meeting
  • Monday, July 15, 5:30pm - 6:30 p.m. 
  • One important item was the approval of a proposed amendment to the LHRB-SIS bylaws. The adopted amendment clarifies that it is permissible (but not mandatory) for the Secretary-Treasurer to serve for consecutive terms. The thinking of the Executive Committee is that there is a learning curve for mastering the AALL financial bureaucracy, and it is a shame to toss out the experience gained after only one term, and start the process all over again.
LHRB Reception
  • Monday, July 15, 7:00-8:30 p.m.
  • Palomino Restaurant

SESSIONS:

Law Libraries and Advocacy: Using Special Collections to Tell the Story of the Japanese American Internment
  • Monday, July 15, from 1:00-2:00 p.m.
  • Sponsored by the LHRB-SIS
  • This program delved into the legal history of the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, a topic of broad interest to those concerned with civil rights and also of historic relevance to the Seattle area. In particular, attendees learned the remarkable story of the 1980s litigation that successfully vacated the convictions of Fred T. Korematsu and Gordon Hirabayashi, who challenged the legality of the military orders that lead to the internment. The program illustrated the ways that law librarians can become involved in telling the story of successful advocacy to right social injustice. It discussed the work of local law school librarians who created major exhibits in collaboration with Japanese American families, members of legal teams, community activists, libraries and other institutions, as well as faculty and departments across the university. Those exhibits brought people into the library, educated students, and solidified a collaborative relationship between the library and one of the school’s key advocacy centers.
  • Stacy Etheredge, Co-coordinator and Co-moderator, West Virginia University College of Law; Etheldra G. Scoggin, Co-coordinator and Co-moderator, Loyola University College of Law Library; Lori Bannai, Seattle University School of Law Library; and Stephanie Wilson, Seattle University School of Law Library.