PLL Strategic Plan 1997-2000

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American Association of Law Libraries Private Law Libraries Special Interest Section

STRATEGIC PLAN 1997-2000

INTRODUCTION

Since its inception in 1977, the Private Law Libraries Special Interest Section (PLL/SIS) of the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) has sought to improve the quality and service of private law libraries by emphasizing their goals, needs and special interests, and to represent those interests and concerns within AALL and the larger community. With almost 1700 firm, corporate and independent librarian members, it is the largest special interest section of AALL. In fact, more than one-third of all AALL members belong to the PLL/SIS, making it a powerful force in the profession, and within the legal community.

As anyone connected with the industry can attest, the practice of law has undergone radical changes in the last ten years, and that, in turn, has radically affected the private law librarian. Outsourcing, budgetary constraints, space reduction, technology, the ever-changing face of the legal publishing industry -- all of these challenge our members, and in turn challenge AALL and PLL to respond to these changes through educational programming and the development of resources to help our members sharpen their skills and give them the tools they need to succeed.

While the PLL/SIS has always been extremely active, we have never before developed a strategic plan. This meant that we were choosing projects and making decisions without periodically stepping back to look at the big picture, an exercise that takes on even more importance as the environment changes rapidly. It also meant that we had nothing against which to measure our successes and failures as an association. As with most all-volunteer organizations, long-range planning is tough to accomplish, for a number of reasons. First, it requires a certain amount of continuity. PLL leaders rotate through the Executive Committee rather quickly, each with his or her own agenda, and it becomes difficult to sustain the momentum necessary to see the project through to completion. In addition, our myriad projects have been so time-consuming that it has been difficult to find the time necessary for strategic planning. And finally, with the Executive Committee members spread across the U.S., the only opportunity for face-to-face interaction has been once a year at the AALL Annual Meeting, a time which is already loaded with activity. Recognizing that the only way to actually carry out strategic planning was to carve out the time to do it, the Executive Committee of PLL met in Dallas in the first part of November of 1996. Out of that came this plan.

There are several parts to this document. The first component is an article on the process, written by JoAn Segal, our facilitator for the strategic planning session. This accurately describes the way we arrived at the results. Coming up with ideas has never been difficult for the leadership of this organization. What was lacking, at least in our estimation, was a theoretical framework - a list of ultimate goals that we wanted to achieve, and a list of criteria out of which we might choose our activities more carefully. After this process, we identified 26 activities that would help us attain our goals. Out of those, we identified the ones we thought we could accomplish, given the limited amount of time, money, and energy.

The second component to the plan is the list of activities where we would like to focus, including where these fell in regard to the vision statements we crafted, and the time line for implementation. This is the heart of the plan itself, and we urge you to read it over several times and to talk about it with your colleagues. Ask yourself: ìHow will these activities affect my ability to do my job? How will I be better off at the end of the plan than I am now?î

Also included in this packet is a response form. We are interested in input from our membership which can help direct and shape our next plan. As with all strategic plans, this is a work in progress, to be fine-tuned and adjusted as we progress. While these are the areas that weíve identified as important, there is, of course, always room for discussion and comment. In fact, we welcome the opportunity to discuss this plan with the membership and listen to their concerns. We also would like to use it as a checklist, of sorts, against which we can measure, at the end of the allotted time, our successes or failures. We hope that future PLL Executive Committees will continue to build on this document, and that it will be regularly compared and contrasted to the Strategic Challenge that is developed by AALL, (which is on a different planning cycle) to make certain that our activities both flow from, and inspire, our parent organizationís planning

. On that note, the PLL Executive Committee would like to thank Roger Parent, AALL Executive Director, for his encouragement to ìthink outside the boxî and his commitment to the PLL; to Frank Houdek, AALL President, and Tory Trotta, AALL Executive Board Member (and Chair of the AALL Long-Range Planning Committee) for their assistance with formulating the plan and helping us put it in the larger context of AALL; and to JoAn Segal, our facilitator, who carried us through to the end with unfailing . enthusiasm. To the extent that the plan shines, it is due in no small part to the involvement of these individuals.

One last comment: while the PLL Executive Committee has identified these projects as ones toward which we should be working, it is the responsibility of each one of us, as members, to make them a reality. Private law librarians are working in a challenging environment, under difficult circumstances. We need each and every one of us to contribute to this organization to the best of our ability in order to keep it responsive to the ever-changing needs of the marketplace. We have a tremendous amount at stake, and if we are to succeed in our task, we need you.

Michael Saint-Onge, Chair
Anne Ellis, Vice-Chair
Mary Smith Forman, Past Chair
Joan Jarosek, Treasurer
Jean OíGrady, Secretary
Sabrina Pacifici, Board Member
Karl Gruben, Board Member

THE PROCESS

Leaders of the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) and of the Private Law Libraries Special Interest Section (PLL/SIS) met in Dallas, November_9-11, 1996 to decide on activities the SIS should undertake in the next 3-4 years. Specifically, the session had the following objectives:

Describe and evaluate the environment in which private law librarians and the PLL/SIS are operating

Ensure all participants were in agreement about the process

Identify values and criteria for selecting activities

Select specific activities

Plan for implementation

 

Participants included: PLL Executive Committee members Michael Saint-Onge, Chair; Mary Smith Forman, Past Chair; Anne Ellis, Chair-Elect; Joan Jarosek, Treasurer; Jean O'Grady, Secretary; Karl Gruben, Board Member; Frank Houdek, AALL President; Tory Trotta, AALL Board Member; Roger Parent, AALL Executive Director; and JoAn Segal, Facilitator. Local arrangements were handled by Joan Jarosek, PLL Treasurer and hostess for the meeting at Jones, Day, Reavis_& Pogue. The meeting began at 2:00_p.m.

The first session began with an informal dialogue on the environment in which legal information professionals work. This continued with discussion of PLL and its place within AALL. Some of the challenges mentioned by the participants included: constant change, technological developments, budgetary constraints, Administrators' belief that technology can reduce the need for librarians, the pressure to reduce costs, the threat of outsourcing, and lawyers judging themselves capable of doing their own research using the Internet.

The group members also discussed the unique environment of a law firm or corporate law library. Law librarians are competing with lawyers and other departments for resources. Key issues included the unrealistic expectations of administrations and clients who believe that technology will reduce costs and increase productivity and profitability and that "everything is on the Web." There are wide differences in technological knowledge among clients which impacts how research is done and its cost-effectiveness. Spiraling book costs and the consolidation of the legal publishing industry are also of great concern. It is difficult to communicate to lawyers that the same product in different media may be quite different in content and searching methods. The group concluded that forming partnerships with lawyers and MIS staff is an effective means for implementing new technologies for library services. Librarians offer their unique perspective on print versus online contents.

Although participants agreed library services are in great demand, the resources needed to maintain and expand services come only with marketing and promotion of the library. In addition, librarians feel great pressure to stay abreast of technological developments. It is of great concern that the time to accomplish such is lacking. Further pressure is felt as librarians roles' are expanding with the explosion of information. Librarians struggle to provide quality information services as library staffs may not possess the increasing skills needed to implement such service. The increased work pace and the resulting stress on the library staff must be addressed. Librarians need to examine how to manage these competing forces of work life.

Most significantly, the group developed five vision statements, describing a desirable future, as follows:

1. A population of private law librarians who will continue to be competent, viable, professional leaders within the private setting.
2 . Employers in private settings will understand the complexity of the legal information environment and the value of law librarians.
3. Law librarians will be a powerful force in shaping publishers' products and services.
4. PLL members will be cutting-edge leaders of the profession within AALL and related organizations.
5. Law librarians will lead balanced and satisfying professional and personal lives.

VALUES

To set the stage for the planning activities of the next two days, the group examined the values and criteria that underlie their work. Identifying values was the more difficult task, but the group members agreed upon the following:

Answering the needs of diverse librarians

Empowerment of law librarians as professionals

Quality of work life

Values consistent with those of AALL

Proactiveness

The assurance of jobs and creation of a sense of community, especially for solo librarians

The prudent use of resources

Enhancement of value for members

CRITERIA

Participants then addressed criteria which would be used to select the specific activities. After generating a long list of possible criteria, the group decided to give preference to activities that:

Benefit the largest number of people

Require resources that are available

Realize goals within the allotted timeline

Achieve goals relevant to the members' point of view

On Sunday morning, the group reconvened to discuss ideas for specific activities that might be undertaken. Using the vision statements as the driving stimulus, the participants generated a list of twenty-six activities, many of which had several parts. Each activity was designed to lead to one or more of the vision statements and discussion was very lively and exciting. (See following document: "Possible PLL Activities" on page_9.) Refinement continued as the group identified interested parties outside of PLL and matched up activities with the various vision statements.

Selecting a list of activities consistent with the criteria and setting a priority on the activities occupied the group on Monday. A chart was prepared using the five vision statements mentioned above, with activities pertinent to each. Participants then initialed three top-priority items under each vision statement. As a result of this prioritizing effort, six groups of activities emerged as being of highest priority. (For these results, see "The Plan_-- Overview" on page_13.) In addition, two activities were identified as ongoing, but requiring prompt attention from the Executive Committee.

Next, the group addressed specific implementation steps for each of the high-priority activities and pinpointed a time frame in which these could be accomplished. This work produced the two most significant documents, "Activities of Highest Priority 1997-2000," (beginning on page_14) and "Implementation Steps: Activities of Highest Priority 1997-2000," (beginning on page_18.)

The last step was to decide how to present the plan to the members and to try to predict some obstacles that might arise and how to overcome them. The planning group was very eager to inform the members about their work and to begin to involve them in implementing the immediate priority activities. In addition to articles in PLL Perspectives, it was decided use of the web page and listserve would facilitate communication of the plan itself. Copies of the report would be made available in a variety of formats. The need for immediate development efforts and securing funding for the various tasks was recognized.

Optimistic at the end of three days' successful work, the group acknowledged that the biggest obstacles were the need for financial and human resources to carry out the complex and difficult tasks. However, the Executive Committee was confident that PLL/SIS would be able to provide even more meaningful services for law librarians.

JoAn Segal
PLL/SIS Strategic Planning Session Facilitator

POSSIBLE PLL ACTIVITIES

1. Market the tool kit. We recognize that the AALL Tool Kit is a valuable aid in promoting the value of law librarians. Since this has already been created, we need to find ways to get it into the hands of the membership.

2. Consumer Alert. We know that our institutions are ultimately concerned with the bottom line. We would like to respond to those concerns by focusing on ways we can educate our membership to become better consumers. We would like to provide consumer information in detail - how much we spend on pocket parts and supplements for each title, % increase in price, etc., so that our members can make informed decisions.

3. Research on the Value of the Law Librarian. Research is needed on how we as librarians are being perceived in our institutions, similar to the Matarazzo study by SLA entitled, ìThe Value of Corporate Libraries: Findings from a 1995 Survey of Senior Management.î Once we know how we are being perceived by managing partners and by law firm administrators, we can respond with appropriate educational materials and programs. It will also allow us to measure success or failure in changing that perception in future studies of this sort.

4. Resource Material for our members. We recognize that our membership is varied, but that there are some reoccurring requests for practical information that would be helpful to get into our membersí hands. We talked about compiling this information into a notebook, and we called this handbook, ìResources /Information in Private Law Librarianship,î or ìRIPLL.î

5. Needs Assessment Survey. What do our members think they need from PLL as an organization? How do we go about finding that out? We explored ways to carry out a membership survey of PLL that would help us identify areas we should be addressing.

6. Address our broader membership. What can PLL do to support librarians in corporate environments, independent librarians, and those librarians who handle records or technical services? Are there resources we can make available for those in one-person libraries, or for librarians in multi-location firms? Are there other constituentsí needs that are not being met?

7. Group Buying Coalition. We like the idea of our members getting some sort of discount on goods and services for being a member. PLL members should be able to point to something concrete and say, ìThis is one advantage to being a member.î

8. Boost Membership. Create an outreach to private law librarians who are members of the chapters, but have not joined the national organization or the SIS. How do we reach them, get them involved? What could we offer them that would make it worth it for them to join?

9. Credentialing. We recognize that there is no course of study in most library schools that prepares librarians to work in law firm settings. We talked about the possibility of setting up a credentialing program for both professionals and nonprofessionals.

10. Training resources. We discussed the development of training videos or pamphlets that our members could use with paraprofessionals that would help them do their job, such as ìhow to shelve,î or ìhow to do looseleaf filing, î perhaps as part of RIPLL.

11. Product reviews and comparisons. Often we are forced to choose between competing products, especially with ever-shrinking budgets. We thought it would be very helpful to have librarian ìexpertsî, who deal with the specific subject areas, rate and evaluate the resources so that others can make better informed choices.

12. Target legal administrators and lawyers. We identified the need to ìget the word outî on the value of professional law librarians to decision makers in our firms. Ways to do that include: publishing in their journals; develop training sessions that we can address to their needs (such as the internet); get on programs for their organizations; make presentations on law librarianship; link our webpage to their webpages; and develop materials that will encourage them to see us as resources.

13. Develop marketing programs and training sessions for librarians. Marketing is the key to success, but few of us have the training on how to market ourselves and our services effectively. The Tool Kit is a great start, but we thought it would be great to build on that and offer a regular course of study to our members.

14. Target library schools. Offer a lecturer in special or law librarianship. Get our material into their hands to encourage new librarians to enter the profession.

15. Identify and promote the competencies of law librarians. The tool kit has identified these competencies. Now, how do we spread the word? How can we package this information so that employers will use it in hiring?

16. Encourage leadership in PLL, in AALL, and in our firms. Leadership was identified as a major need. Ways we could encourage leadership might be programs on confidence building, developing a leadership institute, or focused articles in upcoming issues of PLL Perspectives.

17. Scholarships and Grants for librarian training. Develop scholarships and grants so that librarians whose firms cannot or will not support them can attend educational programming.

18. Adopt a major theme or topic for the year. Focus on one major theme per year, and make it the subject of newsletter articles, educational programming at the annual meeting, regional programming, or a pamphlet or packet on the topic.

19. Research on vendors. Do we know enough about our vendors? We could analyze their annual reports, and identify their strengths and weaknesses.

20. Focus on vendor relations. Given the amount of discussion of this topic on the listserves, we identified this as a major concern. We should: become advocates for librarian interests; develop consumer reports for librarians; use resources at our disposal (web site, broadcast fax, listserves, newsletters) to educate our members; do subject reports with a comparison for products, or member product reviews; use our leverage to educate our members and partner with information providers.

21. Share best practices. With 1700 members, we have a great deal of collected wisdom. Wouldnít it be great if we could tap into that resource to do practical problem-solving? Sharing best practices could take place in a variety of formats on a variety of topics.

22. Pre-Conference and follow-up sessions at the Annual Meeting. We recognized that we get together as an SIS just once a year, and that we could make more effective use of that time by planning additional meetings and sessions before and after the meeting.

23. Develop librarian negotiation skills. Librarianship in the late 1990's requires a great deal of negotiating, and yet most of us never learned to do it effectively. We should develop programming and educational materials to help librarians learn those skills.

24. Annual Conference scheduling modifications. We believe that, in order for the educational programming at the Annual Meeting to meet the needs of private law librarians, we need to begin to think more creatively. We should encourage varied time slots (not solely limited to 90 minute sessions), programs that are presented in a variety of learning styles and formats, doing our own programming back to back on Sunday, etc.

25. Pursue partnerships with other, non-library groups such as the ABA or the ALA. The two organizations that we as private law librarians should work most closely with are the Association of Legal Administrators (ALA) and the American Bar Association Law Practice Management Section (ABA/LPM). Identify and develop ways we can interact with these two groups more effectively.

26. Brain trust / Summit meeting. On key issues, we should call together the noted leaders or ìexpertsî in the area to brainstorm on possible actions that should be taken.
This accomplishes two tasks: It addresses the concern, and it helps establish us as a major player in the industry.

THE PLAN

OVERVIEW

Our five vision statements (see page 6) were the guiding principles for the selection of activities. We wanted to choose projects that would advance these goals, that would have a real impact on the future of the private law librarian and for our profession as a whole.

Out of these projects, we found that we were drawn to six ìsetsî of activities, with each addressing at least one of these statements. The six sets of activities are:

1. Marketing the tool kit.
2. Activities which address consumers and publishers (a combination of a number of activities that appeared on our initial list).
3. Research on the Value of the Law Librarian.
4. Research/Information Handbook (RIPLL).
5. Targeting Employers (Lawyers and Administrators).
6. Sharing Best Practices.
We felt that these six activities also met our other criteria: they benefitted the largest number of people, they required resources that are or can be made available, they can be accomplished within the allotted amount of time, and they are relevant from the memberís point of view.

Each of these six items had a number of parts, each with different time lines: immediate, medium-range, long-range, and ongoing attention. Attached you will find two documents: ìActivities of Highest Priority 1997-2000,î which outlines the activities by project, and ìImplementation Steps: Activities of Highest Priorities 1997-2000,î which breaks down the projects by time line.

ACTIVITIES OF HIGHEST PRIORITY 1997-2000

I. Marketing the tool kit

Initiative: We recognize that the AALL Tool Kit is a valuable aid in promoting the value of law librarians. Since this has already been created, we need to find ways to get it into the hands of the membership.

Implementation

: Ongoing: 1. Distribute order forms at Association of Legal Administratorsí (ALA) Meeting.
2. Place ads in prominent legal and library periodicals/journals.
3. Solicit articles on successful use of the tool kit.
4. Send complimentary copies of the tool kit to the heads of law and library related organizations, especially the ìManagement Briefing Sectionî of the kit.
5. Get a review of the tool kit published in Legal Information Alert, and/or Trends in Law Library Management and Technology.
6. Promote it in AALL Spectrum and PLL Perspectives.
7. Use the PLL listserve and Webpage to get the word out.

II. Consumers and publishers

Initiative: We know that our institutions are ultimately concerned with the bottom line. We would like to respond to those concerns by focusing on ways we can educate our membership to become better consumers. We would like to provide consumer information in detail - how much we spend on pocket parts and supplements for each title, % increase in price, etc., so that our members can make informed decisions. We would also like to provide product reviews and comparisons. In addition, we would like to become consumer advocates for librarian interests, partnering with information providers to ensure that librarian input is being solicited.
Implementation:

Immediate: 1. Appoint a PLL Consumer Advocacy Committee, linked to CRIV.
2. Establish a Consumer Alert Column in PLL Perspectives.
a. How to be a wise consumer.
b. How PLL can act as a consumer advocate.
3. Begin product reviews in PLL Perspectives.
4. Consider folding additional information into Price Index to Legal Titles:
a. Track information in detail such as cost of pocket parts, supplements, including % increase for each title.
b. Track information in detail about publisherís average increase in costs for these items.
c. Track according to subject area.

Medium 1. Gather long term price change information. Use (or create, if necessary) a software package to help us document these changes.
2. Publish articles in periodicals geared toward the practicing bar and/or firm administrators to reinforce the idea that private law librarians are involved in shaping publishersí products, services and costs.

Long 1. Put the consumer information / product reviews on our webpage.
2. Encourage other organizationsí webpages to link to ours, so that they will begin to see us as the ìexpertsî in legal information resources.

III. Research on the Value of the Law Librarian

Initiative: Research is needed on how we as librarians are being perceived in our institutions, similar to the Matarazzo study by SLA entitled, ìThe Value of Corporate Libraries: Findings from a 1995 Survey of Senior Management.î Once we know how we are being perceived by lawyers, managing partners and by law firm administrators, we can respond with appropriate educational materials and programs. It will also allow us to measure success or failure in changing that perception in future studies of this sort.

Implementation:

Immediate 1. Find out about available monies.
2. Appoint a committee to draft plan and carry it out.

Medium 1. Solicit funds from other sources as back up to the project.
2. Publish article in PLL Perspectives on earlier research (including information on the Matarazzo Survey.)

Long 1. Conduct the survey.
2. Report the results.
3. Evaluate the findings and use this information in future strategic plans.

IV. Resources/Information (RIPLL)

Initiative: We recognize that our membership is varied, but that there are some reoccurring requests for practical information that would be helpful to get into our membersí hands. We talked about compiling this information into a notebook, and we called this handbook, ìResources /Information in Private Law Librarianship,î or ìRIPLL.î

Implementation:

Immediate 1. Establish a PLL committee to carry this forward.
2. Establish an Editorial Advisory Board.
3. Seek vendor support for start-up costs, but no editorial input from vendors.

Medium 1. Use the listserve to find out what is relevant to the members.
2. Generate discussion on the listserve to help identify info/resources for inclusion in RIPLL.
3. Establish a rough outline of the handbook.

Long 1. Prepare a marketing plan.
2. Implement a possible subscription plan or standing order for updates.
3. Publish RIPLL.

V. Target Employers (Lawyers and Administrators)

Initiative: We identified the need to ìget the word outî on the value of professional law librarians to decision makers in our firms. Part of the challenge of this project is to ìmeet them where they live,î to find ways to present our skills to them in a variety of formats and to establish ourselves as the experts in legal information resources.

Implementation:

Immediate 1. Pull-out section in PLL Perspectives.
a. ìGive-to-your-bossî sections addressing areas of interest to them.
b. Should appear 1-2 times a year.
c. First one should be on cost-control and what PLL is doing.
d. Have extra copies available for sale / distribution.
2. Begin to develop other materials we can use to educate employers, distribute at ALA, ABA/LPM meetings, etc.
3. Support an official representative to the ABA Law Practice Management Section.

Medium 1. Work to make our website relevant to what they do, so they willl access our site and begin to see us as the information experts.
2. Publish in their journals relevant, high-quality articles.

Long 1. Develop educational programming proposals for ALA and for the ABA/LPM annual meetings.
2. Serve on committees or serve as resource personnel to these organizations.

VI. Share Best Practices

Initiative: With 1700 members, we have a great deal of collected wisdom. Wouldnít it be great if we could tap into that resource to do practical problem-solving? Sharing best practices could take place in a variety of formats on a variety of topics.

Implementation:

Immediate 1. Annual conference.
a. Conduct face-to-face meetings in town hall setting.
b. Present a component of PLL program, similar to ìhot topic.î
2. Initiate discussions on the listserve, with input from members on how they solved the problem or dealt with the situation.

Medium: 1. Produce an electronic town hall meeting (with limited participation) on best practices, similar to the roundtable discussion that appeared in AALL Spectrum.
2. Create a moderated open discussion on selected topics on the listserve.

IMPLEMENTATION STEPS: ACTIVITIES OF HIGHEST PRIORITY 1997-2000

I. Ongoing activities requiring prompt attention:

A. Marketing the tool kit
1. Distribute order forms at Association of Legal Administratorsí (ALA) Meeting.
2. Place ads in prominent legal and library periodicals/journals.
3. Solicit articles on successful use of the tool kit.
4. Send complimentary copies of the tool kit to the heads of law and library related organizations, especially the ìManagement Briefing Sectionî of the kit.
5. Get a review of the tool kit published in Legal Information Alert, and/or Trends in Law Library Management and Technology.
6. Promote in AALL Spectrum and PLL Perspectives.
7. Use the PLL listserve and Webpage to get the word out.

II. Immediate Attention

A. Consumers and publishers
1. Appoint a PLL Consumer Advocacy Committee, linked to CRIV.
2. Establish a Consumer Alert Column in PLL Perspectives.
a. How to be a wise consumer.
b. How PLL can act as a consumer advocate.
3. Begin product reviews in PLL Perspectives.
4. Consider folding additional information into Price Index to Legal Titles:
a. Track information in detail such as cost of pocket parts, supplements, including % increase for each title.
b. Track information in detail about publisherís average increase in costs for these items.
c. Track according to subject area.
B. Research on the Value of the Law Librarian
1. Find out about available monies.
2. Appoint a committee to draft plan and carry it out.
C. Resources/Information (RIPLL)
1. Establish a PLL committee to carry this forward.
2. Establish an Editorial Advisory Board.
3. Seek vendor support for start-up costs, but no editorial input from vendors.
D. Target Employers
1. Pull-out section in PLL Perspectives.
a. ìGive-to-your-bossî sections addressing areas of interest to them.
b. Should appear 1-2 times a year
c. First one should be on cost-control and what PLL is doing.
d. Have extra copies available for sale / distribution.
2. Begin to develop other materials we can use to educate employers, distribute at ALA, ABA/LPM meetings, etc.
3. Support an official representative to the ABA Law Practice Management Section.
E. Share Best Practices
1. Annual conference
a. Conduct face-to-face meetings in town hall setting
b. Present a component of PLL program, similar to ìhot topicî
2. Initiate discussions on the listserve, with input from members on how they solved the problem or dealt with the situation.

III. Medium-Range Attention

A. Consumers and Publishers
1. Gather long term price change information. Use (or create, if necessary) a software package to help us document these changes.
2. Publish articles in periodicals geared toward the practicing bar and/or firm administrators to reinforce the idea that private law librarians are involved in shaping publishersí products, services and costs.
B. Research on the Value of the Law Librarian
1. Solicit funds from other sources as back up to the project.
2. Publish article in PLL Perspectives on earlier research (including information on the Matarazzo Survey, entitled, ìThe Value of Corporate Libraries: Findings from a 1995 Survey of Senior Management.î)
C. Resources/Information (RIPLL)
1. Use the listserve to find out what is relevant to the members.
2. Generate discussion on the listserve to help identify resources for inclusion in RIPLL.
3. Establish a rough outline of the handbook.
D. Target Employers
1. Work to make our website relevant to what they do, so they will access our site and begin to see us as the information experts.
2. Publish in their journals relevant, high-quality articles.
E. Share Best Practices
1. Produce an electronic town hall meeting (with limited participation) on best practices, similar to the roundtable discussion that appeared in Spectrum.
2. Create a moderated open discussion on selected topics on the listserve.

IV. Long-Range Attention

A. Consumers and Publishers
1. Put the consumer information / product reviews on our webpage.
2. Encourage other organizationsí webpages to link to ours, so that they will begin to see us as the ìexpertsî in legal information resources.
B. Resources/Information (RIPLL)
1. Prepare a marketing plan
2. Implement a possible subscription plan or standing order for updates.
3. Publish RIPLL.
C. Research on the Value of the Law Librarian
1. Conduct the survey.
2. Report the results.
3. Evaluate the findings and use this information in future strategic plans.
D. Target Employers.
1. Develop educational programming proposals for ALA and for the ABA/LPM annual meetings.
2. Serve on committees or serve as resource personnel to these organizations.

CONCLUSION

Strategic planning is hard work. It takes a thorough knowledge of where we have been, a firm grasp on the challenges we face, and a sense of where we would like to be as individuals, as an association, and as a profession. It is two parts history book, and one part crystal ball. But the hard work can pay off. The PLL/SIS now has a set of activities that we can work to accomplish.

We are excited about this plan and the fruit it will ultimately bear. We urge you to join in to make it a reality. Attached you will find a Strategic Plan Response Form. We encourage your feedback.

PLL/SIS RESPONSE FORM

1. What is your general assessment of the PLL Strategic Plan and the priorities that have been set for the PLL/SIS through the activities and initiatives?

 

 

2. Are there any of the strategic initiatives that in your view require higher priority?

 

 

3. Are there any areas of concern that you feel are not represented by the current Strategic Plan? Please elaborate. (Use the back of this page or additional sheets, if necessary.)

 

I would be interested in working in this specific task as set out in the plan:_____________________________________________________.
Please contact me to discuss this further.
Name___________________________________________
Address _________________________________________
________________________________________________
Phone number______________Fax number_____________
E-mail address____________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

Return this questionnaire to: Anne Ellis, Holme Roberts & Owen, 1700 Lincoln Street, Suite 4100, Denver, CO 80203. Phone: 303/866-0212 Fax: 303/866-0200 E-Mail:ellisa@hro.com