AALL eBriefing / Bylaws Vote Results

Bylaws Vote Results

The proposal to change the name of American Association of Law Libraries to the Association for Legal Information has failed by a vote of 1998 (80.11 percent) opposed, to 496 (19.89 percent) in favor. A record number of members voted on this proposal, with 59.51 percent casting a ballot.

The votes were verified this morning by two members, who served as the election tellers.

A virtual town hall to provide time for further discussion and to answer any questions you may have will be held on Tuesday, February 23, from 2:00-3:00 p.m. (CST). You must register to attend the town hall, and registration is open now.

Thank you to all who voted. The recommendation to change the name of the Association has started a conversation about the future of AALL, and the profession as a whole, that we hope to continue. We want to spend time this year discussing the future of law librarians in more detail. More information about this will be announced in the near future.

Ballot Survey Results
Of those who cast ballots, 90.96 percent chose to respond to our survey. Here are the results:

Type of library where currently employed:

  • Corporate – 35 (1.55%)
  • Court – 95 (4.20%)
  • County – 84 (3.71%)
  • Government – 136 (6.01%)
  • Independent – 16 (0.71%)
  • Law Firm – 724 (31.99%)
  • Law School – 1010 (44.63%)
  • Public – 15 (0.66%)
  • Solo – 2 (0.09%)
  • State – 11 (0.49%)
  • Student – 4 (0.17%)
  • Retired – 63 (2.78%)
  • Unemployed – 11 (0.49%)
  • Other – 57 (2.52%)

Years an AALL member:

  • 0-5 years – 475 (20.99%)
  • 6-10 years – 372 (16.44%)
  • 11-15 years – 375 (16.57%)
  • 16 or more years – 1041 (46.00%)

Sincerely,
Keith Ann Stiverson
AALL President

AALL eBriefing / Bylaws Vote on Proposed Name

Bylaws Vote on Proposed Name

Voting opened today on the proposal to change our name to Association for Legal Information. This morning you should have received an email message with information on how to vote that includes a unique voting PIN. If you did not receive the email, please contact Chris Siwa.

This proposal has generated a thoughtful discussion among our members, and I hope that many more will join the conversation, and that all of you will examine the rebranding materials we have made available on AALLNET.

As the voting begins, I am adding my voice to the discussion to give the main reasons why I favor the name change:

  • I believe that Association for Legal Information is the best name, because it focuses on our central area of expertise rather than limiting our profession to a place or to a collection of resources.
  • It is time to change our name, and Association for Legal Information more immediately communicates the scope and importance of the work performed by our members, who are the experts in legal information. The proposed name is inclusive of the many different and evolving roles members now play in the legal profession and in society. It epitomizes an energized, modern, forward-thinking profession in a way that American Association of Law Libraries does not.
  • Association for Legal Information will move us forward by expanding opportunities and will help to give us a voice in the critical conversations taking place in the legal community. It will better communicate to those who have an impact on our ability to be successful–the dean, COO, court administrator, managing partner, or judge–the significant role we play in their organization.

Please keep in mind that the membership will make the final decision, and that means you. Voting is open until February 10, so please be sure to vote!

Sincerely,

Keith Ann Stiverson
AALL President

AALL eBriefing / Bylaws Vote on Proposed Name

Bylaws Vote on Proposed Name

At its November 2015 meeting, the Executive Board unanimously approved a recommendation that the Association’s name be changed to Association for Legal Information, and be submitted to members for a vote to change the bylaws to reflect the new name.

Voting will begin Tuesday, January 12 and results will be announced Thursday, February 11. Both the proposed bylaws revisions and sample ballot have been posted to AALLNET.

The name proposal is a result of the branding initiative that AALL undertook in the spring of 2015. For more information about the process, or to get involved in the conversation, listed below are additional resources.

The proposed name change has sparked some great member discussion. To further the discussion, and to answer your questions, two Virtual Town Hall meetings were scheduled for December. The first Town Hall was held on December 1, and a recording from the meeting is posted to AALLNET. The second Town Hall will be held Friday, December 18 at 11 a.m. central. 

Friday’s Town Hall will begin with a short presentation about the proposed name change, followed by a Q&A session. During the Town Hall, you will have the opportunity to ask questions by phone and by live chat.  You can also submit questions in advance to rebrand@aall.org

Register for the December 18 Town Hall

Please email rebrand@aall.org if you have any questions or would like additional information.

AALL eBriefing / Virtual Town Hall Meetings

Rebranding Initiative

The Executive Board’s recommendation to change the Association’s name to the Association for Legal Information has sparked some great discussion. To further the discussion, and to answer your questions, two Virtual Town Hall meetings have been scheduled for December.

Date: Tuesday, December 1, 2015
Time: 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. (CST)
Online
Register now.

Date: Friday, December 18, 2015
Time: 11:00 a.m. to Noon (CST)
Online
Register now.

Both sessions will be recorded and made available to members on AALLNET.

The Town Hall meetings will begin with a short presentation about the name change recommendation, followed by a Q&A session. During the Town Hall, you will have the opportunity to ask questions by phone and by live chat.

You can also submit questions in advance to rebrand@aall.org. For the Town Hall on December 1, submit your questions no later than Monday, November 30. For the December 18 meeting, submit your questions between December 2 and 17.

The name proposal is a result of the branding initiative that AALL undertook in the spring of 2015. For more information about the process or to get involved in the conversation, listed below are additional resources.

Sincerely,

Keith Ann Stiverson
AALL President

AALL eBriefing / Recommendation Conversation

Recommendation Conversation

Last Thursday, in an eBriefing to the membership, I reported to you that the AALL Executive Board had voted unanimously to recommend a name change for consideration and a vote by the membership. The proposed name, Association for Legal Information, is now being discussed on a number of member communication channels, and as a result some questions have been raised. To be responsive to your questions, we have updated the FAQs on AALLNET.

Thank you for taking part in a thoughtful discussion about the possibility of a new name for our Association. I hope that more of you will join in the conversation, which is important to our future. We will soon be scheduling a town hall meeting to elicit member feedback, and will continue to keep you informed via eBriefing, eNews, and on the website at www.aallnet.org/rebrand .

Sincerely,

Keith Ann Stiverson
AALL President

AALL eBriefing / Executive Board Name Recommendation

Executive Board Name Recommendation

In my August eBriefing about the AALL Rebranding Initiative, I remarked that “rebranding” is about more than a new name; it is about shaping our reputation and our future. More importantly, I asked you to think about what our reputation is, what we want it to be, and how we can best position ourselves for success.

We started the rebranding initiative last March, and it has been an enlightening journey. As part of that journey, we considered a name change to see if a new name could better communicate the varied roles our members play in the field of legal information. After much discussion, thought, and careful consideration, at its November 7 meeting, the Executive Board voted unanimously to recommend to the membership a new name, “Association for Legal Information.”

The Board is convinced that a name change is a necessary and healthy conversation for all of us to have as we position our Association for the future. Ultimately, it is up to all of you to decide, as we plan to put this forward for a vote on January 12.

Before the voting, we will hold virtual town hall meetings to elicit member feedback, encourage dialogue on a dedicated AALL My Communities discussion board, and continue to keep you informed via eBriefings, eNews, and information posted to www.aallnet.org/rebrandVoting will begin on January 12 and results will be announced on February 11. In the meantime, we have updated the FAQs on AALLNET in anticipation of questions you may have.


AALL Vision
AALL and its members will be the recognized authority in all aspects of legal information.

AALL Core Purpose
AALL will advance the profession and the professional growth of its members.

 

I would like to thank all of the members of the Brand Working Group, who have put so much time, energy, and thoughtfulness into this project: the AALL Executive Board, Council Chairs, and representatives of the Academic Law Libraries, Government Law Libraries, and Private Law Librarians and Information Professionals Special Interest Sections. Their participation has ensured that we considered all points of view.

As I have talked with members of the Brand Working Group about their journeys through this process, I have noted a few things that we all have in common: our feelings about the name change have shifted dramatically over the course of the project, we are passionate about our jobs and shaping our future, and, most importantly, we are dedicated to our colleagues and our friends who are the heart of this organization and the field of legal information.

I wish that all of you could have been in the room on Saturday, November 7, where the excitement was palpable. The trepidation about change, which we all have, was surpassed by the belief that we are helping to create new opportunities for the future of the Association. I hope that as you reflect on our treasured history and look toward our unwritten future, you will embrace this as enthusiastically as the Brand Working Group and I have.

We want to hear from you. The AALL My Communities discussion board (“Association for Legal Information”) is active and I have asked the members of the Brand Working Group to kick-start the conversation. Also, we will be scheduling the dates for the Virtual Town Hall meetings soon, so please watch for the announcements. As is always the case, please feel free to contact me directly with your comments at kstivers@kentlaw.iit.edu, or we can arrange a phone call at your convenience.

Sincerely,

Keith Ann Stiverson
AALL President

AALL eBriefing / AALL Executive Board Election Results

AALL Executive Board Election Results

I am pleased to announce the results of the 2015 AALL Executive Board Election. This year, 1,254 AALL members (30.33%) cast ballots and elected the following:

Vice President/President-Elect
(July 2016 – July 2017)

Gregory R. Lambert
Chief Knowledge Services Officer
Jackson Walker L.L.P.
Houston, Texas

Treasurer
(July 2016 – July 2019)

 Jean L. Willis
Assistant Director for Support Services
Sacramento County Public Law Library
Sacramento, California

 

Board Members
(July 2016 – July 2019)

Mary Jenkins
Law Librarian and Director
Hamilton County Law Library
Cincinnati, Ohio

Meg Kribble
Research Librarian and Outreach Coordinator
Harvard Law School
Cambridge, Massachusetts

Congratulations to our successful candidates and thank you to all who ran for office. It is this commitment and dedication that makes the profession, and especially AALL, a strong and vibrant community.

Sincerely,

Katherine K. Coolidge, Esq.
AALL Secretary

AALL eBriefing / AALL Rebranding Initiative: Creating Our Future

AALL Rebranding Initiative: Creating Our Future

 

Over the past several months, the AALL Rebranding Initiative has been moving forward using the results of the May member survey to inform the process. So, thank you to all of you who completed the survey and shared your thoughts. I have also participated in several rebranding sessions, and I have learned to think about the true purpose of such a project. “Rebranding” is not about changing our name; instead, it is about thinking of the Association from the point of view of others, not ourselves, and considering the question of what we want our reputation to be.

I hope you will join in and start thinking about how we can create the future of our reputation. Some of our special interest sections have decided to change their names. Should the Association do the same? Perhaps; but first, let’s think about what our reputation is, what we want it to be, and how we can best position ourselves for the future.

FAQs and a project update are available to keep you up-to-date on the progress of this project. I hope you will read them and think about the project in terms of what we want others to think of us. Your questions and comments are welcome.

Sincerely,

Keith Ann Stiverson
AALL President

FAQs

AALL Rebranding Initiative Update

AALL eBriefing / AALL Member Makes History with Citation in Supreme Court Opinion

AALL MEMBER MAKES HISTORY WITH CITATION IN SUPREME COURT OPINION

John Cannan, research and instructional services librarian at Drexel University Thomas R. Kline School of Law in Philadelphia, made the history books yesterday, June 25. The United States Supreme Court opinion King v. Burwell cites Cannan’s Law Library Journal article, “A Legislative History of the Affordable Care Act: How Legislative Procedure Shapes Legislative History,” 105 Law Libr. J. 131 (2013).

Chief Justice Roberts cites Cannan’s article on page 14 of the opinion:

 

The Affordable Care Act contains more than a few examples of inartful drafting. (To cite just one, the Act creates three separate Section 1563s. See 124 Stat. 270, 911, 912.) Several features of the Act’s passage contributed to that unfortunate reality. Congress wrote key parts of the Act behind closed doors, rather than through “the traditional legislative process.” Cannan, A Legislative History of the Affordable Care Act: How Legislative Procedure Shapes Legislative History, 105 L. Lib. J. 131, 163 (2013). And Congress passed much of the Act using a complicated budgetary procedure known as “reconciliation,” which limited opportunities for debate and amendment, and bypassed the Senate’s normal 60-vote filibuster requirement. Id., at 159-167. As a result, the Act does not reflect the type of care and deliberation that one might expect of such significant legislation. Cf. Frankfurter, Some Reflections on the Reading of Statutes, 47 Colum. L.Rev. 527, 545 (1947) (describing a cartoon “in which a senator tells his colleagues ‘I admit this new bill is too complicated to understand. We’ll just have to pass it to find out what it means.'”).

King v. Burwell, 2015 US 70, at 14.

King v. Burwell upholds a key provision of the Affordable Care Act that provides tax subsidies for the purchase of health insurance in all 50 states.

This is the second time that a Law Library Journal article has been cited by a Supreme Court Opinion; in 2010, Shady Grove Orthopedic Associates, P.A. v. Allstate Ins. Co. cited Jose R. Torres’ and Steve Windsor’s article, “State Legislative Histories: A Select, Annotated Bibliography,” 85 Law Libr. J. 545, 547 (1993).

Congratulations to John Cannan for this exciting achievement!

Sincerely,

Holly M. Riccio
AALL President

AALL eBriefing / AALL President Holly M. Riccio Reflects on the ABA National Summit

AALL President Holly M. Riccio Reflects on the ABA National Summit on Innovation in Legal Services

Earlier this year, ABA President William Hubbard established the Commission on the Future of Legal Services to improve the delivery of—and access to–legal services. The Commission published an Issues Paper, requesting that key stakeholders submit written comments, which AALL did. The Commission also held hearings at the ABA Midyear Meeting in Houston, in February, and I was able to attend on behalf of AALL and testify—along with other bar leaders, judges, law firm practice managers, and legal service providers—focusing my remarks on libraries’ integral role in expanding access to justice for all individuals and communities.

The culminating event for this Commission was the invitation-only National Summit on Innovation in Legal Services, which took place last month at Stanford Law School, assembling 200 participants, all proven leaders and innovators in the legal profession.

AALL was invited to participate in this event, convened to “challenge thought leaders both from within and beyond the legal profession to . . . spark fresh thinking about the delivery of legal services and to find new, actionable ideas that are not constrained by traditional models and are rooted in the essential values of protecting the public, enhancing diversity and inclusion, and pursuing justice for all.” The two-day event–packed with inspiring keynote speakers, panelists, and TED-style mini-lectures, and combined with ample time for breakout sessions organized around the key areas identified in the Issues Paper–was not only a great opportunity for AALL to start developing richer relationships and collaborations with the ABA in the access to justice arena, but also reflective of the commitment by the ABA leadership to bring about real change in the way we define and deliver legal services.

The topics covered over the course of the two days included innovation both within and beyond the legal sphere, challenges to innovation, focusing on the client, “Bridge the Gap” programs, and, at the conclusion of the Summit, reporting out from the breakout sessions with a reaction panel. There were five different breakout session topics that attendees were pre-assigned to, based on their interests: Access Solutions for the Underserved, Blue Sky Innovation, Dispute Resolution, Preventive Law, and Regulatory Opportunities.

I was assigned to one of the two Access Solutions for the Underserved breakout groups, and others in the group represented organizations and associations that have a vested interest in access to justice. Judging from what I experienced in my breakout session and the reports from the other breakout groups, there are definitely possibilities for AALL to partner with the ABA on some of these newly identified opportunities to provide better access to justice.

Some of the more obvious ones were library involvement and participation in co-location as a means to provide legal services and resources, and collaborating with states to provide content (in the form of links to primary and secondary legal resources) for state legal help portals. Some of the other interesting opportunities I saw were to possibly partner with the ABA on a grant to promote and encourage technology innovation and to collaborate with legal hackers to create sites and apps aimed at providing legal information to the public.

Now, the hard work for the ABA will really begin, with the Commission taking all the inspiration and information from the Summit and creating and prioritizing action items to implement change in the legal profession.

For a more in-depth overview of the ABA National Summit on Innovation in Legal Services, check out my summary of the highlights and takeaways on the AALL Spectrum Blog.

Sincerely,

Holly M. Riccio
AALL President