Education & Training

AALL ANNUAL MEETING

Each year CS-SIS sponsors several programs at the AALL Annual Meeting & Conference. Topics cover a variety of subjects, from the human aspects of automation to the newest hardware and software and their uses. Recent topics include networking, document imaging systems, interactive multimedia, distance learning, and the Internet, as well as professional development topics such as the changing roles and career paths of librarians in computing services.

  • 2017 Austin, TX

    Saturday, July 15

    CS-SIS Karaoke with Ken

    9:00pm – 12:00am
    Official AALL Program Listing

    Sunday, July 16

    CS-SIS Roundtable: Collaboration: Librarians Sharing Their Coding Knowledge

    12:45pm – 1:45pm (ACC-Room 4C)
    Official AALL Program Listing

    CS-SIS Roundtable: Utilizing Instructional Technology in the Classrooms

    5:15pm – 6:15pm (Hilton-Room 416B)
    Official AALL Program Listing

    Monday, July 17

    CS-SIS Roundtable: Digitization Initiatives and Building Institutional Repositiories

    3:30pm – 4:45pm (Hilton-Room 416B)
    Official AALL Program Listing

    Tuesday, July 18

    CS-SIS Breakfast and Business Meeting

    7:00am – 8:15am (Hilton-Room 400)
    Official AALL Program Listing

    Cool Tools Café

    2:30pm – 3:30pm (ACC-Room 9ABC)
    Official AALL Program Listing

    One of the most attractive features of the Cool Tools Café, for both the presenters and attendees, is the casual atmosphere. Gathering in small groups, participants will learn about emerging or existing technologies from librarians who have implemented these technologies in their own libraries. This more intimate setting allows for the opportunity to discuss why the technologies are useful, how they work, and how they can be implemented. Tools for legal research, collaboration, marketing services, instruction, productivity, citation, presentation, and website functionality are examples of past demonstrations. The variety of the demonstrations epitomizes the dynamic role of today’s legal information professional.

    Takeaways:

    1. Participants will learn about existing or emerging technologies.
    2. Participants will have the opportunity to interact with the presenters in small group settings.
    3. Participants will learn how to implement the technology in their home library.

    Who Should Attend: Individuals from all types of law library settings, whether tech savvy or beginners

    Coordinator(s):
    Jessica Hanes – University of Michigan Law Library

  • 2016 Chicago, IL

    Saturday, July 16

    W1: AALL Hackathon: Connecting Legal Information

    8:00am – 5:00pm (IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law)
    Official AALL Program Listing

    A hackathon brings together those with knowledge of available resources and needs, like law librarians, with those who have the technological know-how to build mobile and web applications to use those resources and meet those needs. At this year’s AALL meeting, Chicago programmers and designers will be invited to join with law librarians to transform governmental and legal datasets into something usable, accessible and amazing. The hackathon will: 1) Create innovative and accessible information sources for patrons and libraries using government or legal information, and 2) Build relationships between law librarians and technologists that will go beyond this event and allow for continued development of specialized applications. Participants at previous hackathons have been amazed by what they were able to accomplish in one day. This year’s session has even more to offer.

    Participants should plan to:

    • Bring a laptop computer to work on.
    • Think about possible project ideas ahead of time. (Some potential datasets will be posted online in advance.) Datasets and projects should focus on providing better access to government data, especially legal information.
    • Share their final results with the rest of the groups.

    Takeaways:

    1. Participants will collaboratively create new resources, such as mobile or web applications that make government or legal information more accessible to libraries or their patrons.
    2. Participants will collaborate across disciplines to draft a plan and timeline for an innovative technology to deliver or organize relevant information.
    3. Participants will learn from others about important data sets, possible technology applications, and advancing free, easy access to legal information by sharing their plans and applications with all groups.

    Who should attend: Librarians who are interested in creating a new information resource, especially those who have a specific set of data that they or their patrons need better access to; programmers who want to understand the public need for accessible information and librarians who want to increase their technology knowledge and skills; anyone interested in free, useful access to government and legal data; those who wish to give back to the community through provision of information services

    This workshop is sponsored in part by GD-SIS and CS-SIS.

    Separate registration fee: $25 for AALL members

    Registration fee includes: program, continental breakfast, boxed lunch, and afternoon refreshments.

    Speaker(s):
    Jessica Dee Haseltine – UNT Dallas College of Law

    Joint Reception of the CS/OBS/RIPS/TS SISs (sponsored by Innovative)

    7:00pm – 9:00pm (Hyatt-Columbus A-D)
    Official AALL Program Listing

    Sunday, July 17

    CS-SIS Roundtable: Hot Topics in Law Library Technology

    12:30pm – 2:00pm (Hyatt-Burnham)

    B1: Deep Dive: Cool Tools Café

    2:30pm – 5:00pm (Hyatt-Grand Ballroom AB)
    Official AALL Program Listing

    One of the most attractive features of the Cool Tools Café, for the presenters and attendees, is the casual atmosphere. Participants will learn in small groups about emerging or existing technologies from librarians who have implemented these technologies in their libraries. The small group setting allows for the opportunity to discuss why the technologies are useful, how they work, and how they can be implemented. Tools for legal research, collaboration, marketing services, instruction, productivity, citation, presentation, and website functionality are examples of past demonstrations. The variety of the demonstrations in these sessions epitomizes the dynamic role of today’s legal information professional.

    Please note: This deep dive session is scheduled for 2.5 hours, running across both the ‘B’ and ‘C’ time slots. Different content will be presented in the first and second half of the program.

    Takeaways:

    1. Participants will learn about existing or emerging technologies.
    2. Participants will have the opportunity to interact with the presenters in small group settings.
    3. Participants will learn how to implement technologies in their home libraries.

    Who should attend: Individuals from all types of law library settings (academic, public, and private), from those who are tech savvy to beginners

    Slate of Demonstrations:

    First Half

    1) Case Analysis Research Assistant
    Pablo Arredondo, Casetext, Inc.

    CARA is a new brief-driven case discovery tool developed at Casetext that supplements traditional keyword query research tools by enabling an attorney to upload entire documents (e.g. briefs) as queries. The tool takes a brief as input and outputs a list of relevant decisions that are not cited in the brief itself.  It does this through data-mining the brief and using the extracted information (citations, key terms, etc) as a sort of “query” to a case database.
    Watch the Presentation

    2) Oral History Metadata Synchronizer
    Kris Turner, University of Wisconsin Law School

    OHMS is a free tool created by the University of Kentucky Louie B. Nunn Oral History Center. Once a library has created an OHMS account, librarians can make oral histories more searchable by adding keywords to a specific section of each oral history and create indexes for each history, basically creating a table of contents for the oral history. Users can do keyword searches, browse the index, and jump to specific sections. Librarians can also add in other pertinent metadata that can provide context to the oral history, such as synopses, external links, GPS coordinates, partial transcription and controlled vocabulary. A full transcript of an oral history, if available, can also be uploaded, synched, and made searchable. The OHMS viewer page can be added to any number of repositories and is easily branded to match your law firm or school’s colors.
    Watch the Presentation

    3) Permanent Links with Perma.cc and Page Vault
    Deborah Ginsberg and Clare Willis, Chicago-Kent College of Law

    Perma.cc is a tool that prevents “link rot.”  Scholars, librarians, and journal editors use Pema.cc to create permanent links to archived materials so a scholar can still provide access to the original material in the event it is altered, moved or removed. Perma.cc is developed and maintained by the Harvard Law School Library in conjunction with university law libraries across the country and other organizations in the “forever” business.

    Page Vault is a similar tool that allows legal professionals to capture and save web content in a way that is forensically defensible and admissible in court. Web pages are captured exactly as they appear online and metadata is automatically saved.
    Watch the Presentation

    Watch the Presentation

    4) Kahoot! Make it Easy to Put Together Fun Quizzes to Assess Student Learning
    Katie Hanschke and Janeen Williams, North Carolina Central University School of Law

    Kahoot! is applicable as a teaching tool for gaining immediate assessments of students’ grasps of concepts in classes or workshops. It can be used for instant polling as well. Interactive and easy to use, it does not require anyone to download software and is mobile device compatible. It also provides analytics that can be reviewed later.
    Watch the Presentation

    5) Making Legal Scholars Bloom with ORCID
    Christine George, University of Buffalo Law School

    ORCID is a persistent digital identifier that is free for individual researchers. Those who sign up receive an ORCID id number and a profile on ORCID’s website. ORCID can benefit legal scholars and those who track and promote their scholarship. I’ll demonstrate how ORCID provides a complete picture of scholarship and ties together multiple scholarly profiles.

    6) Slack
    Kenton Brice, University of Oklahoma College of Law

    Have you heard the rumor that “email is broken”?  Well, that may not be totally true, but Slack is a great alternative to email for dedicated teams. Slack brings back the “chat room” of yesteryear into a modern and useful platform for teams to collaborate and communicate on any project, or just in general!  Learn about this powerful communication tool and all that it can do on its own and with the power of application integrations.

    7) Popplet: A Tool for Collaboration
    Jenny Zook, University of Wisconsin Law School

    Popplet can be used in the classroom or at work. Popplet helps students to learn visually. In the classroom, students use it for learning, capture facts, thoughts, and images, or mind-mapping. At work, use Popplet to generate ideas, jot down notes, brainstorm and plan projects.
    Watch the Presentation

    8) U Before Me: Understanding and Implementing UX Tools
    Sara Pic, Law Library of Louisiana

    For librarians attracted to technology and design, it’s easy to get distracted by the latest shiny new trend. But the heart of all design should always be UX – User Experience. In this demonstration, we will take a look at several easy-to-use tools for creating the best possible technological experience for all library users, focusing specifically on tools for designing and improving websites. I will demonstrate and discuss ReadClearly (free plain language legal glossary tool),  WriteClearly (reading grade level analysis),  Compressor.io (image compression), Beeline Reader (increase readability), the Noun Project (icons for everything), and WAVE Web Accessibility Evaluation Tool.
    Watch the Presentation

    Second Half

    1) Accio Formative Assessment!
    Eliza Fink, Lincoln Memorial University Duncan School of Law

    LibWizard Suite is the latest in the line of Springshare products. Giving the user four “magical” tools, LibWizard allows you to create assessment-driven content and collect directed feedback from students and faculty. This demo will cover the unique features of the Forms and Surveys components of LibWizard as well as providing attendees with a walk-through of the live Quizzes and Tutorials in this intuitive platform.
    Watch the Presentation

    2) Scanner Pro 7: Transform your iPhone or iPad into a portable scanner
    Catherine Biondo, Northeastern University School of Law

    Want to save and share that great article you just read?  Traveling and want to keep track of your receipts?  Had a terrific brainstorming session with a colleague but jotted your notes on pieces of scrap paper?  Forget about hunting all over for a photocopier or desktop scanner:  Scanner Pro 7 puts the scanner in the palm of your hand.  We’ll look at some of the unique features – including new text recognition (OCR) – that make this iPhone/iPad app a must have for digitizing, organizing, editing and sharing paper documents wherever you happen to be.

    3) Neota Logic
    Jesse Bowman, Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law

    Neota Logic is an expert systems platform used by law firms, general counsel, legal information publishers, nonprofits, and, increasingly, as part of experiential law school courses.  The platform requires no knowledge of coding and allows users to develop tools that provide automated legal analysis, client intake, and document creation.  At the heart of applications created using Neota Logic is an in-depth understanding of the law governing a particular situation, making the tool relevant for law librarians in all types of organizations.
    Watch the Presentation

    4) Adobe DC
    Kenton Brice, University of Oklahoma College of Law
    Adobe recently updated its Pro version of Adobe Acrobat to DC (Document Cloud).  Using the cloud as a storage and delivery mechanism, Adobe has streamlined working with PDFs across platforms and with others, especially when it comes to forms and obtaining signatures.  This practice-oriented session will cover the new features of Adobe’s Document Cloud and how law librarians and attorneys (current and future) can be using the Document Cloud to modernize their document production and sharing.

    5) Manage your research assistants like a law firm with Clio
    Jason Zarin, University of Richmond School of Law

    Clio is an online legal practice management tool that makes it easy to create matters, assign tasks, archive emails and files, and track time. Clio is a commercial product but is free for academic use. With Clio you can not only manage student RAs and their projects for faculty but also teach them professionalism and how to work as associates on a team. Create your own library law firm: Dewey Teachem and Howe.
    Watch the Presentation

    6) Grammarly
    Scott Uhl, University of Minnesota Law School
    Grammarly is a browser extension and a standalone program which goes beyond normal spelling and grammar checking. Grammarly’s writing app finds and corrects hundreds of complex writing errors — so you don’t have to. This demonstration will show how it works and what kinds of errors it can identify.

    7) Elucidat
    Becka Rich, Nova Southeastern Shepard Broad College of Law

    Elucidat is e-learning software designed to make the creation of online training materials easier, faster, and higher quality. Companies such as Tesca, The Utility Warehouse, and Johnson & Johnson have successfully used it to train emp

    Coordinator(s):
    Kurt Meyer – University of Minnesota Law Library
    Jessica Hanes – University of Michigan Law Library

    CS-SIS Karaoke with Ken

    9:00pm – 11:59pm
    Official AALL Program Listing

    Tuesday, July 19

    CS-SIS Breakfast and Business Meeting (sponsored by Bloomberg Law, LexisNexis, Thomson Reuters, and Wolters Kluwer)

    7:00am – 8:15am (Hyatt-Plaza Ballroom A)

  • 2015 Philadelphia, PA

    Saturday, July 18

    W1: AALL Hackathon: Connecting Legal Information

    8:00am – 4:30pm (Peirce College)
    Official AALL Program Listing

    A hackathon brings together those with knowledge of available resources and needs, like law librarians, with those who have the technological know-how to build mobile and web applications to use those resources and meet those needs. At this year’s AALL meeting, east coast programmers and designers will be invited to join with law librarians to transform governmental and legal datasets into something usable, accessible, and amazing. The hackathon will create innovative and accessible information sources for patrons and libraries using government or legal information, and build relationships between law librarians and technologists that will go beyond this event and allow for continued development of specialized applications.

    Participants should plan to:

    • Bring a laptop computer to work on.
    • Think about possible project ideas ahead of time. (Some potential datasets will be posted online in advance.) Datasets and projects should focus on providing better access to government data, especially legal information.
    • Share their final results with the rest of the groups.

    Takeaways:

    1. Participants will collaboratively create new resources, such as mobile or web applications, that make government or legal information more accessible to libraries or their patrons.
    2. Participants will collaborate across disciplines to draft a plan and timeline for an innovative technology to deliver or organize relevant information.
    3. Participants will learn from others about important data sets, possible technology applications, and advancing free, easy access to legal information by sharing their plans and applications with all groups.

    Who Should Attend: Librarians who are interested in creating a new information resource, especially those who have a specific set of data to which they or their patrons need better access; programmers who want to understand the public need for accessible information and librarians who want to increase their technology knowledge and skills; anyone interested in free, useful access to government and legal data; those who wish to give back to the community through provision of information services

    This workshop is sponsored in part by GD-SIS, CS-SIS and RIPS-SIS.

    Separate registration fee: $25 (for AALL members)

    Registration fee includes: program, continental breakfast, boxed lunch, and afternoon refreshments.

    Speaker(s):
    Jennifer WondracekUniversity of North Texas-Dallas
    Shawn FriendFlorida Coastal School of Law

    Joint Reception of CS/OBS/RIPS/TS SISs

    7:00pm – 9:00pm (Marriott-Grand Ballroom Salon CD)
    Official AALL Program Listing

    Sponsored by Innovative Interfaces

    Sunday, July 19

    CS-SIS Roundtable: Hot Topics in Law Library Technology

    11:30am – 12:45pm (PCC-Room 112A)
    Official AALL Program Listing

    CS-SIS Karaoke with Ken

    9:00pm – 11:59pm
    Official AALL Program Listing

    Monday, July 20

    Cool Tools Café Deep Dive

    10:00am – 12:30pm (PCC-Grand Ballroom A)
    Official AALL Program Listing

    In the relaxed, casual atmosphere of the Cool Tools Café, attendees will learn in small groups about emerging or existing technologies from librarians who have implemented these technologies in their libraries. The small-group setting allows for easy discussion of why the technologies are useful, how they work, and how they can be implemented. Tools for legal research, collaboration, marketing services, instruction, productivity, citation, presentation, and website functionality are examples of past demonstrations. The variety of the demonstrations in this single session epitomizes the dynamic role of today’s legal information professional.

    Please note: This deep dive session is scheduled for 2.5 hours, running across both the ‘D’ and ‘E’ time slots.

    Takeaways:

    1. Participants will be able to identify useful existing or emerging technologies.
    2. Through interaction with the presenters in small-group settings, participants will be able to ask about first-hand experiences with the technologies.
    3. Participants will learn how to implement the technology in their home library.

    Who Should Attend: Legal information professionals from all types of law library settings, whether tech savvy pros or novices

    Slate of Demonstrations:

    Session I: 10:00-11:00 AM

    1) Surface Pro 3: Interactivity of a tablet, Productivity of a laptop (Emily Barney, Chicago-Kent College of Law) Tablets are built to be portable and intuitive to work with, but operate with a limited universe of apps and web access. Laptops allow a wider range of productive and creative activities when you can work with files directly, install a range of software and easily connect to other devices. Microsoft’s Surface line allows both: I’ll demonstrate how I can use this device for everything from notes & social media at the conference to image editing and coding on the go. I’ll also show some of the touch and stylus tips that make Windows 8 shine on this device.

    2) Decoding Encryption: Simple Tools to Secure Your Data (Kurt Meyer, University of Minnesota Law School) What information about a client, student, or yourself could the wrong person retrieve from your laptop or smartphone if it were lost or stolen? Even if you utilize password protection the answer might surprise you! Fortunately, encrypting important data is a simple process on any device or operating system. This demo will show how to encrypt flash drives, hard drives, and specific files on both Mac and Windows computers. Built-in encryption tools available on both Android and iPhone devices will also be demonstrated.

    3) Asana to the Rescue! Online task and project management (Debbie Ginsberg, IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law Library) Need help keeping track of projects and tasks? Are your team members tired of hunting through their emails for project details and updates? Consider giving Asana a try! Asana is an online project and task management tool that makes it easy to track projects and tasks from your desktop or mobile device. Debbie will demo how she and others at Chicago-Kent use Asana as well you show her favorite features, least favorite, and what you should consider when choosing a group project management tool.
    Watch the Presentation

    4) Canva (Maribel Nash, Northwestern University School of Law) No time to become an expert in graphic design? No problem! Canva takes the guess work out of creating beautiful signs, slides, images, and more. A standard set of templates and plenty of free options simplify the task of creating content that can be reused in a variety of print and digital formats.

    5) Nearpod (Jesse Bowman, Northwestern University School of Law) Nearpod is a free platforms for creating interactive mobile presentations, with subscription options offering advanced features.The platform allows you to create interactive presentations,control students’ activity in real time, and incorporate slides, questions, polls, audio, and video.It is also platform-agnostic, so as long as students have some sort of technology with them, whether it’s a laptop with a web browser, a chromebook, or a tablet, they can participate.

    6) Research Guides Reloaded: LibGuides v2 (Austin Martin Williams, Georgia State University College of Law) LibGuides v2 offers guide creators the ability to exercise more control over the look and feel of their research guides. Creators can now choose between the traditional tabbed navigation or the new side navigation option. In addition, the use of a standard box format now enables creators to use several content types (links, rss feeds, rich text, etc.) within the same box.

    7) Presentation Tools beyond Powerpoint and Prezi (Kris Turner, University of Wisconsin Law School Library) Mastered (or bored with) PowerPoint and Prezi and curious to learn what else is out there? Many web-based and free tools have been developed over the past few years that make creating slideshows fun again.

    8) “You know what would be cool…” Using Google Forms to Collect & Share Information (Marcia L. Dority Baker, University of Nebraska College of Law) Google Forms are an easy way to gather and share data. This demo will highlight how to create a Google Form, share the collected data and the variety of uses for Google Forms.

    9) Casetext.com: A Tool for Legal Research, Legal Commentary & Case Summaries (Marin Dell, Texas Tech University School of Law Library) Casetext is a free online legal research tool that allows researchers to do free case-law research, access over 600,000 case summaries from judicial opinion parentheticals, and participate in an active community of legal practitioners and scholars posting open source legal commentary.

    10) Capturing all the Things: Using Confluence and JIRA as a Frontline Knowledge Management & Statistics Solution (Jessica Randall Panella, UConn School of Law Library) It can be very difficult to capture all the issues and statistics associated with a library’s service desk. Atlassian’s Confluence and JIRA products are an affordable knowledge management solution for frontline desk needs. Confluence assists in creating, capturing, storing and disseminating information staff need to provide great customer service. While JIRA captures statistics, creates automated workflows and captures ‘all the things’.

    11) Smart watches: fitness, fashion, function (Sue Sirkis, US Courts Library – 8th Circuit) An overview of the latest trend in wearable technology – smart watches. We will go over the field as a whole, then do a deep dive with a demonstration of the Apple Watch.

    Session II: 11:15-12:30 PM

    12) Let’s Play with Microsoft Sway! (Patrick Parsons, University of South Carolina Coleman Karesh Law Library and Abby Deese, University of Arizona Cracchiolo Law Library) One part PowerPoint, one part Prezi, one part Tumblr, Microsoft Sway provides an easy environment to create visually striking cloud-based presentations, newsletters, and photo albums. The platform allows social media integration and the easy inclusion of Tweets, YouTube videos, and Flickr photos. This demo will show participants how to quickly and easily create a sleek, engaging presentation using Sway with pictures taken on-site and information quickly pulled from the internet.

    13) Google Drive + AutoCrat: DIY Guided Form Completion (Kate Fitz, Sacramento County Public Law Library) Using a combination of Google Docs, Google Forms, and Google Sheets, plus a free plug-in called “AutoCrat,” libraries can create questionnaires that guide patrons through the information needed to complete a form, then automatically create the customized document. The data is stored and processed by Google, so the library must have a Google Drive account. Patrons do not need a Google account, but do need to supply an email address, since the forms arrive via email. The Sacramento County Public Law Library has used this system to create a popular “Forms Wizard” service, helping hundreds of patrons to fill out grant deeds, affidavits, and other popular forms.

    14) The Springshare Lounge saved my life! Upgrading to Libguides v.2. (Jessica Strefling, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit) Getting ready to take the plunge and upgrade to Version 2? Have no fear! It really isn’t as scary as it seems. Come see how one library prepared for the big transition and even converted their whole library homepage into a Libguide. See what steps you should take to ensure a smooth transition. Also, learn how to get the most out of this fabulous product without having to be a professional web designer or a code guru.

    15) Screencasting Software for Short and Simple (or Long and Complex) Videos (Alex Berrio Matamoros, CUNY School of Law) Screencasting software can be used to make tutorial, training, or lecture videos.

    16) Prezi Ipsa Loquitur (Sara V. Pic, Law Library of Louisiana) Prezi is a new free online replacement for the same-old PowerPoint. Because it is more dynamic, participants in trainings, classes, and CLEs are less likely to get that snooze-inducing feeling from staring at yet another PowerPoint presentation. It also has the ability to replicate from other presentations so you don’t have to reinvent the wheel every time (I also find this feature helpful for just learning about all the many things Prezi can do since you can take apart a Prezi you like and see how it all operates).

    17) TrialPad – Legal Presentation Software with More Power than Powerpoint (Darin Fox, The University of Oklahoma College of Law) TrialPad is one of the most highly reviewed applications for the legal market. It appears on many “top 10” lists of the best legal apps. As law firms (and the rest of the world) become increasingly paperless, lawyers need to be able to organize, annotate, and present information in the digital format.TrialPad facilitates the presentation of information in courtrooms, boardrooms, and even an office setting with individual clients, and it is specifically geared for the legal profession. Law librarians have an opportunity to provide support for skills training courses, such as Trial Techniques, Evidence, and Client Counseling by learning TrialPad, providing access to iPads, and training students and faculty on the use this specialized presentation software.

    18) Sony Digital Paper: Using it for a librarian’s day-to-day work (Lisa Peters, Case Western Reserve University School of Law) Sony Digital Paper can be used as a digital file folder of research. Instead of carrying around 100s of pages of articles to read, highlight, and scribble notes, you carry around 100s of pages of digital articles to read, highlight, and scribble notes. The digital paper is as light and thin as a note pad. Plus, there is zero chance that the pages can end up out of order. This is tool is also great for keeping library project memorandum, project calendars, and notes. For the regular day-to-day, you can create a daily / weekly calendar, take meeting notes, and doodle.

    19) Trello (Tom Gaylord, Northwestern University School of Law) Trello is a flexible, easy-to-use cloud-based application that can help get you (or a team) organized.

    Coordinator(s):
    Kara Young – Northwestern University School of Law

    E1: Uncovering Discovery Systems: Digging Beyond the Hype and Gripe

    11:30am – 12:30pm (PCC-Room 204BC)
    Official AALL Program Listing

    A panel of presenters representing IT, public, and technical services will share their from-the-trenches experiences in analyzing, choosing, implementing, and managing discovery systems, including comparison to traditional integrated library systems, with special consideration for law libraries and legal services. The program will take a “what you need to know now” approach to the state of discovery systems in order to explore the pros and cons of discovery, with helpful tips and tricks for anticipating, avoiding, and addressing system pitfalls. Attendees will have the opportunity to participate in the discussion through active brainstorming activities, adding their own experiences and ideas.

    This program is sponsored by the CS-SIS.

    Takeaways:

    1. Participants will be able to identify four primary functions of discovery systems, compare the nature of these functions in three different discovery platforms (Encore Synergy, Summon, and VuFind), as well as assess the suitability of these systems in meeting individual institutional needs.
    2. Participants will list and discuss six ways in which discovery systems connect across and are intertwined within the broad areas of information technology, reference/research, and technical services.
    3. Participants will be able to identify six opportunities and challenges related to discovery systems, how discovery systems relate to their own jobs, and how to best utilize and apply their existing skills and strengths to these tools.

    Who Should Attend: Individuals who are planning to implement a discovery system or who already have a discovery system in place and are looking for ways make the most of the tools

    Speaker(s):
    Nancy Babb – The University at Buffalo, State University of New York
    Iain Barksdale – University of Alabama School of Law
    D. Prano Amjadi – Santa Clara University
    Matthew L. Zimmerman – Georgetown University Law Library
    Kristina Anderson – Seton Hall University Law Library

    Tuesday, July 21

    CS-SIS Breakfast and Business Meeting

    7:00am – 8:15am (Marriott-Grand Ballroom Salon J)
    Official AALL Program Listing

    Sponsored by Bloomberg BNA, LexisNexis, Thomson Reuters, and Wolters Kluwer Law & Business

  • 2014 San Antonio, TX

    Saturday, July 12

    W1: AALL Hackathon: Building the Information Future

    8:00am – 5:00pm

    Official AALL Program Listing

    Takeaway 1: Participants will collaboratively create new resources, such as mobile or web applications that make government data more accessible.

    Takeaway 2: Participants will work in teams of diverse professions to draft a plan and timeline for their project.

    Takeaway 3: Participants will utilize time management skills to complete their projects within the specified time.

    A hackathon is an event that brings together those with the knowledge of available resources and needs (e.g., law librarians) with those who have the technology knowledge to build new and unique projects, such as mobile and web applications. For this workshop, San Antonio programmers and designers will be invited to join with law librarians to use technology to transform a government data set into new resources that will increase the data’s accessibility and discoverability. Teams of librarians and technologists will work collaboratively to plan and implement these projects. The main goals for this hackathon are to create new information sources for patrons and librarians using government information, and to build relationships between the two groups that will go beyond this event and encourage further collaboration in the development of information resources.

    Who should attend: Anyone interested in creating a new information resource, improving the accessibility and discoverability of government information, giving back to the community, and increasing their technology knowledge and skills

    This workshop is sponsored by the GD-SIS, the SR-SIS, the CS-SIS and the RIPS-SIS

    Track(s): Information Technology, Reference, Research and Client Services

    Separate registration fee: $25.00 for AALL members

    Registration fee includes: program, continental breakfast, lunch, and refreshments.

    Coordinator and Moderator:
    Jennifer Wondracek – University of Florida, Levin College of Law

    Joint Reception of the TS/OBS/RIPS/CS SISs

    7:00pm – 9:00pm (Marriott Riverwalk-Alamo Ballroom Salon D)
    Official AALL Program Listing

    Sponsored by Innovative Interfaces

    Sunday, July 13

    CS-SIS Roundtable: Hot Topics in Law Library Technology

    12:00pm – 1:00pm (Marriott Riverwalk-Alamo Ballroom Salon A)
    Official AALL Program Listing

    CS-SIS Karaoke with Ken

    9:00pm – 11:59pm
    Official AALL Program Listing

    Join your colleagues in our annual social outing with Ken Hirsh as he leads us to the Republic of Texas Restaurant on the River Walk on Sunday, July 13. Karaoke starts at 9:00 PM. The restaurant is at 526 River Walk Street, about a half-mile walk from the Marriott Rivercenter. For complete details and updates visit the official website at http://karaokewithken.info.

    Monday, July 14

    D4: Cool Tools Café

    2:30pm – 3:45pm (HBGCC-Room 006CD)
    Official AALL Program Listing

    The variety of the demonstrations in this single session epitomizes the dynamic role of today’s legal information professional. Presenters will demonstrate tools in small groups at individual tables. Attendees are free to wander from table to table observing the presentations and interacting with the presenters. The casual, small group setting allows for the opportunity to discuss why the technologies are useful, how they work, and how they can be implemented. Tools for legal research, collaboration, marketing services, instruction, productivity, citation, presentation, and website functionality are examples of past demonstrations.

    Slate of Demonstrations:

    1) Scooped! Digital Curation in your library with Scoop.it (Kris Turner, University of Wisconsin Law School)  Continuing education, news updates and professional development are all integral parts of both the legal and library worlds.  Scoop.it is a free service that allows you to discern which news topics you want to follow and share with your staff, colleagues, or attorneys.  Scoop.it discovers the news and topics for you, and then allows you to annotate, share and distribute the events and viewpoints important to you and your users.  Stop by and see a digital newspaper edited by a librarian in action!

    2) vBulletin 5 Connect: Powering the Legal Information Institute (LII) Reference Desk (Charlotte Schneider, Rutgers School of Law – Camden) vBulletin 5 Connect is forum software that allows you to easily create, build, and manage a self-hosted or cloud-based online discussion site. Easily create discussions on the user end while managing the forum from the Administrator Control Panel. Customize the look and design of your forum; manage users and usergroups; subscribe to sub-forums and discussions; post messages publicly or send private messages. The LII Reference Desk, powered by vBulletin 5, is intended for use by law librarians and self-represented parties, alike, as both a go-to resource for posting questions and finding answers, as well as a knowledge bank for sharing experiences and expertise.

    3) You Don’t Have to Pay a Penny for Their Thoughts: Free Audience Response Systems (Kristen R. Moore, Stetson University College of Law) Want to poll your audience during a presentation?  Want to give your students a quiz and get instant feedback? There are a number of audience response systems that let you do just that and more. And, depending on your needs and the size of your audience, you may be able to do it without spending a penny. This demonstration will introduce you to several technologies that allow you to gather audience responses for free, including Socrative, GoSoapBox, mentimeter, and mQlicker. It will introduce you to their key features and explain what comes with a free account and what must be paid for.

    4) Screencasting Software for Short and Simple (or Long and Complex) Videos (Alex Berrio Matamoros, CUNY School of Law) Screencasting has become popular in law libraries for creating quick videos on-demand to answer reference questions, short tutorials to share online with patrons, or longer presentation videos for use in a flipped classroom setting. The use of two free Windows screen recording software programs will be demoed, along with a free video editing application. A list of free and paid Windows and Mac screencasting applications will be provided.

    5) iPads on Trial: Working with TrialPad (Debbie Ginsberg, IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law Library) iPads are great for reading email and other documents, but can they be used for trial presentations?  You bet!  Since 2010, the TrialPad app has helped attorneys to seamlessly show judges and juries trial documents, images, and videos.  In this demo, you’ll learn TrialPad basics as well as ideas for how to use this app in the courtroom — and the classroom.

    6) LibGuides 2.0: What’s New, What’s Gone, and What’s Important (Tawnya K. Plumb, University of Wyoming College of Law) Stop by for a brief introduction to LibGuides and a longer conversation about improvements available in LibGuides 2.0.  We’ll talk about responsive design, enhanced content types, new layout options, the image manager, the streamlined Springshare dashboard, and MORE.

    7) Research On-the-Go: The Benefits and Limitations of Legal Research Apps (Ashley Ames Ahlbrand, Indiana University Maurer School of Law) You don’t always have the luxury of conducting legal research from the comfort of your desk.  Luckily, most vendors understand that, and several legal research apps have been developed in the past few years to meet that need.  In this demonstration, Ashley Ahlbrand of Indiana University Maurer School of Law will demo a few of the major legal research apps and a few lesser-known ones, identifying both their capabilities and limitations.

    8) Google Hangouts: From the Porch to the Podium (Marin Dell, Hofstra University Law Library) Google Hangouts is a global socialization and collaboration tool that promotes communication online between individuals, groups and presenters/educators.  Google Hangouts are part of the Google+ platform and consist of Text Chats (up to 100 people), Video Calls (up to 10 people for a personal account/up to 15 for a business account), and Hangouts on Air (a broadcast/recording viewable on YouTube).

    9) Speed Reading Software: For You and For Me (George Taoultsides, Harvard Law School) Speed reading has been around since the 1950s. Today developers are using the research from the past to create software that can help you read faster and comprehend better. Spritz and other developers are taking advantage of the small screen sizes of smart phones and tablets and utilizing speed-reading principles to the benefit of readers. The current crop of speed reading software, while still in nascent form, project a word or two at a time on the screen. The viewer is able to read faster because she no longer has to move her eyes across the page, which slows down reading. Speed reading software can project up to 1200 words per minute, which is four times as fast as the typical reader’s 300 words per minute.

    10) Create Animated Videos Like a Pro (Karina Condra, University of Denver, Sturm College of Law) New tools are appearing on the market that allow anyone to enhance their videos and presentations with animations. Animation software has been around for a long time. However, the programs are costly and the learning curve steep. This new breed of software provides animated templates that can be modified with a few easy steps.

    11) iPad and iPhone Apps to Boost Productivity (Brian Anderson, Ohio Northern University College of Law) Tablets have become well-known for personal digital entertainment, but they can make a significant impact in a professional context as well. This demo will introduce iPad and iPhone apps that can help you increase your work productivity in a variety of ways, particularly with note-taking and file viewing applications (especially useful in meetings), rss readers and apps to read websites on the go, and other ways to take what traditionally has been limited to a laptop computer and use it on a tablet in a variety of ways.

    12) Swivl: DIY Lecture Capture Anywhere (Elizabeth Farrell, Florida State University College of Law) Recording lectures, presentations and other instructional videos can be challenging without dedicated AV equipment and personnel – that’s where the Swivl can help. The Swivl allows you to record video with your iDevice, Android, or DSLR cameras utilizing a portable robotic base (the Swivl). Unlike a conventional tripod, the Swivl tracks the presenter via a Bluetooth device that also serves as a remote and microphone. The Swivl can be used to record traditional lectures in classrooms or “on location” where ever its needed. Cool Tools Café attendees will get the chance to check out a Swivl in person and perhaps record a video!

    Coordinator(s):
    Patrick Butler – University of Connecticut School of Law Library
    Vicki Steiner – UCLA Law Library

    Tuesday, July 15

    CS-SIS Breakfast and Business Meeting

    7:00am – 8:15am (Marriott Rivercenter-Salon J)
    Official AALL Program Listing

    Sponsored by Bloomberg BNA, LexisNexis, Thomson Reuters & Wolters Kluwer Law & Business

    Separate registration fee: $20.00 – Registration deadline: June 16

  • 2013 Seattle, WA

    Saturday, July 13

    CS-SIS Karaoke with Ken

    9:30pm – 11:59pm
    Official AALL Program Listing

    Joint Reception of the TS/OBS/RIPS/CS SISs

    7:00pm – 9:00pm
    Official AALL Program Listing

    Sponsored by Innovative Interfaces

    Sunday, July 14

    A8: Responsive Web Design: Designing One Website That Looks Great on Every Device

    11:15am – 12:15pm
    Official AALL Program Listing

    Takeaway 1: Participants will understand the benefits of responsive web design for users.

    Takeaway 2: Participants will be able to work with parent institutions if and when they implement a responsive web deisgn.

    Takeaway 3: Participants will be able to implement responsive web designs for their own websites.

    2013 is the ‘The Year of Responsive Web Design’ according to Pete Cashmore of Mashable.com. Responsive web design allows web developers to create the optimal viewing experience for website users on any device – from desktop to mobile phone.

    This session will include an introduction to the benefits and practical uses of responsive web design for the end user, a discussion involving libraries whose institutions have implemented a responsive design, and technical demonstrations of how to implement a responsive design using various tools and techniques.

    Who should attend: Librarians who want to know more about modern website design, especially for multiple devices; librarians who are responsible for their library web content or websites; library decision makers who are responsible for work with outside consultants or web teams

    Track(s): Library Management, Information Technology, Reference, Research and Client Services

    Coordinator(s):
    Ellen Augustiniak – University of California, Irvine School of Law
    Jason Eiseman – Yale Law School

    Moderator(s):
    Ellen Augustiniak – University of California, Irvine School of Law

    Speaker(s):
    Jason Eiseman – Yale Law School
    Marcia L. Dority Baker – University of Nebraska College of Law
    Elmer R. Masters – Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI)

    B3: Cool Tools Cafe

    2:00pm3:30pm
    Official AALL Program Listing

    Is there an emerging or existing technology that would solve a problem for your library or make an existing process more efficient? The answer is, YES! During this session, learn in small groups from librarians who have implemented these technologies in their libraries as you discuss why the technologies are useful, how the technologies have been implemented, and how you, too, can apply them to your workplace. Additionally, tools for collaboration, legal research, added website functionality, marketing services, instruction, productivity, citation, and presentation will be demonstrated.

    Slate of Demos

    1) Augmenting your library: Layar, Aurasma and Google Goggles (Kris Turner, University of Wisconsin Law School) One of the most rapidly developing areas of tablet and smartphone technology is augmented reality apps. These apps enhance (or augment) a physical object you are viewing. Be it a sign, book or national landmark an augmented reality app can add information, animations or links to it. It’s hard to describe, but exciting to experience! Check out how these apps can be used in your library and other unique ways that augmented reality can work for you.

    2) Increasing your Prezence in Teaching (Katie Crandall, Florida State Law Research Center)  The average attention span of a gold fish is 9 seconds. The average attention span of today’s adult is 8 seconds. How do you teach a student whose focus is less than her pet’s? By learning how to snag attentions and increase your teaching presence with Prezi! Prezi is a virtual whiteboard that allows you to emphasize concepts with zooming technology that enables audiences to see, understand, and remember ideas. Perfect for the classroom, workshop, meeting, or one-on-one session, learn how this innovative and mobile-device-friendly technology can revolutionize the way you deliver ideas. Already heard about Prezi? Stop by to learn about the newest system updates and how best to utilize the ever-evolving Prezi technology.

    3) Go Online for Free with CourseSites (Karina Condra, University of Denver, Sturm College of Law) CourseSites is a free eLearning platform by BlackBoard. Come see an example of how it is being used to deliver an online legal research skills certificate program.

    4) Vuvox: Create a Digital Collage (Diana Botluk, Barry University, School of Law) Vuvox is a cloud-based tool used for creating an interactive, media-rich collage. Librarians can use Vuvox to create online displays, instructional resources, and tutorials. It can also be used by teachers or students as an alternative to popular slide-based presentation platforms.

    5) Notability: The Ins, Outs and What-Have-Yous (Marin Dell, Hofstra Law) Notability, Apple’s #17 most downloaded paid app of all time, allows you to expand your note-taking abilities with annotated PDFs, handwriting or typing options, linked audio recording, advanced word processing and more.

    6) RSS Readers (Elliott Hibbler, Northeastern University School of Law) RSS readers are an important current awareness tool for organizing, reading and sharing content streams from all across the internet. While the now-defunct Google Reader may have been the most popular reader, there are several good options still available. This demonstration will cover RSS readers on several platforms, for following your favorite sites at work, at home, or on the go.

    7) Escape the Chaos: Plan and Organize Your Research and Writing with Scrivener (Timothy J. Gallina, University of North Carolina School of Law) Scrivener is a word processor and project management tool designed to assist users with all aspects of the writing process, from first outline to final draft. This demo will illustrate how librarians can use key Scrivener features (Corkboard, Outliner, Scrivenings) to structure, compose and edit their scholarly articles, research guides, blog posts and other writing projects.

    8) e-Learning made Easy: The Power of Articulate® Storyline (Susan David deMaine, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law) Storyline from Articulate® helps you create enhanced e-learning materials by combining interactive presentation functions such as embedded videos and web objects, hotspots, and drag and drop, with full-scale screencasting and interactive quizzing. It also offers a range of avatars and animations to add interest, branching of the learning path to tailor instruction to individual users, and slide layers to make building interactions more manageable. In addition, you don’t have to publish multiple iterations of your work to reach different devices. In one iteration, Storyline publishes to multiple formats. The appropriate format will then automatically be delivered to the requesting device. Unlike similar products, Storyline has an interface that is familiar to PowerPoint® users, making for a gentle learning curve and plenty of time for creativity.

    9) Screencasting Software for Short and Simple, or Long and Complex, Videos (Alex Berrio Matamoros, CUNY School of Law) Screencasting has become popular in law libraries for creating quick videos on-demand to answer reference questions, short tutorials to share online with patrons, or longer presentation videos for use in a flipped classroom setting. The use of two free Windows screen recording software programs will be demoed, along with a free video editing application. A list of free and paid Windows and Mac screencasting applications will be provided.

    10) No Flash (Drives) Please: Storing Files in the Cloud (Debbie Ginsberg, IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law) Are you annoyed because your iPad doesn’t have a USB port?  Do you regularly need to send files three times the size allowed by your email service?  Are you on a committee that needs to share a few dozen documents?  In this demo, I’ll show you some popular solutions for storing files in the cloud —  from Dropbox to Spider Oak to Google Drive (and more).  I’ll discuss pricing, security, and other issues with storing files on remote servers.  I hope to see you there.

    11) Happily Ever(Note) After (Jordan Jefferson, Yale Law School) Have you ever wished that you’d wake up to find that cute forest animals have cleaned your house, sewed your clothes, and organized your life like they do in the fairy tales? We may not all have fairy godmothers and talking animals, but we can make work easier by using the right tools. Evernote is a software suite that can help you take notes; capture webpages; sync files across devices; and edit, highlight, annotate, organize, and search your content. Almost anything you can think of can be put in Evernote – from webpages and emails to to-do lists and pictures. Learn how to use Evernote to organize your research, writing, emails, and life (if you’d like) and live Happily Ever(note) After.

    12) Go Go Gadget Chrome (Kara Young, Northwestern Law School) No longer the new kid on the block, many analysts rank Chrome the current winner in the browser wars. This session will briefly demo some useful extensions and apps that help make this browser a popular choice. Stop by to learn more about Chrome and suggest your own personal favorite add-on.

    13) Yes, There’s an App for That:  iPad and iPhone Apps for Productivity and Fun (Bonnie Shucha, University of Wisconsin Law School) There is an app for everything these days, it seems, from the amazingly helpful to the frighteningly bizarre.  This demo will introduce lots of iPad and iPhone apps that can help you do everything from increase your work productivity (such as document scanners, pdf editors, and multimedia tools) to manage your daily life (including travel apps, reminders, and tools to track your library books).  We’ll even throw in some just-for-fun apps (like the BroStache mustache simulator and an app that tells you the best time run to the restroom during the movie).

    14) Mobile Road Warrior: Create, Capture, & Annotate on Android tablets or the iPad (Lucinda Harrison-Cox & Raquel Ortiz, Roger Williams University School of Law) Imagine reducing the amount of paper you carry around each day and yet getting a lot of work done effectively on a tablet!  In this session, Android and iPad users will be introduced to mobile apps that allow you to take notes by handwriting; create Office documents; capture paper documents or web content; and annotate PDFs.  We will also discuss how these tools interact with popular cloud storage options, such as Dropbox and the ever popular Evernote.  Apps that will be covered include: FreeNote, Handrite, Penultimate, GoodNotes, Polaris Office, QuickOffice, CamScanner, Pocket, Instapaper, iAnnotate, and Adobe Reader.

    15) Insta-Feedback:  Using Socrative for Teaching and Workshops (Becka Rich, Nova Southeastern University Law Center).  Socrative is free cloud software for polling, quizzing, and playing games with students or in workshops.  It works with computers and smart devices.  I will demonstrate ways to use it to engage students and rapidly get feedback for both short term and long term sessions.

    16) Beyond our Borders: iPad Apps for Foreign & International Legal News and Documents (Marty Witt, Columbia Law School)  The world is shrinking and developments abroad impact our lives and the lives of our patrons here in the United States.  Fortunately, technology is keeping pace and making it easier than ever to stay informed, even when we aren’t in front of our computers.  Come explore some of the best iPad apps available for legal publications and primary source retrieval from outside of the U.S., and suggest your own favorites.  The focus will be on free and non-subscription English-language apps.

    Coordinator(s):
    Kincaid C. Brown
    Patrick H. Butler
    Ellen Qualey

    Monday, July 15

    CS-SIS Breakfast and Business Meeting

    7:00am – 8:45am
    Official AALL Program Listing

    Sponsored by Bloomberg Law/Bloomberg BNA, LexisNexis, Thomson Reuters and Wolters Kluwer Law & Business

    Ticketed event: $20.00; advance registration required by June 17.

    This year’s breakfast will include a speaker. Details are below:

    USER RESEARCH FOR NON-RESEARCHERS:
    HOW TO GET STARTED AND KEEP GOING

    People like products that are “easy to use”, “user-friendly” and “help do what I need to do”, and we strive to create things that are pleasing to our customers. How do we know, if we hit the mark before the product is out there? What can we do better to build our products right the first time? How can we do this, if we don’t have much time, budget and special skills, but do have many hats, stakeholders and often conflicting requirements?

    The session will introduce you to some essentials of user research and usability, and how to integrate them in the lifecycle of your products and services. We will look into three key phases where user research can make a real difference. We will talk about some methods that can be applied at each phase, how to pick the right one for the job in specific circumstances, and how to get started. The session will focus on challenges of doing user research on a shoestring and will equip you with a few tips and tricks to overcome them. You will practice some of those skills through interactive exercises and will learn where and how to look for further help to make user research part of your regular routine.

    PRESENTER
    Lada Gorlenko is a Research and Strategy Lead at Artefact, a leading User Experience company in Seattle. Lada has nearly two decades of experience in research of all flavors, including forensic, cross-cultural, educational and product development.  Before joining Artefact, Lada worked at the European Commission, British Telecom, IBM and Microsoft, where she led research projects and managed research teams for a wide variety of consumer and enterprise products.

    CS-SIS Pop-Up Meeting

    11:45am12:45pm
    Official AALL Program Listing

    CS-SIS is a haven for the curious. For those librarians looking a bit to the west to see what else is out there. Sometimes we strike gold and sometimes we strike out. Unfortunately, there are no treasure maps, only fellow travelers to share the journey.

    Innovation requires risk.  There is always a possibility of failing, sometime failing hard.  And there are those that would argue that those who aren’t failing aren’t trying.  Our goal with this session is to fail up-to build on the experiences of those whose big ideas didn’t turn out quite like they expected or to think about ways to make the big idea successful from the get go.

    At the CS-SIS pop up meeting, you can drop your next big idea (or the one that tanked) into a hat.  If we pull it out, we’ll talk about it. The group will brainstorm ways that it could be tweaked to be successful or provide feedback from someone who has already been there.

     

  • 2012 Boston, MA

    Saturday, July 21

    8:30am — W4: Going Mobile: Building Mobile Applications
    7:00pm — Joint Reception of the TS/OBS/RIPS/CS SISs
    9:00pm — Karaoke with Ken

    Sunday, July 22

    10:45am — A3: Guerrilla Usability Testing
    3:45pm — C1: Searching Legal Opinions: The Google Scholar Approach

    Monday, July 23

    10:45am — CS-SIS Program: Enhancing Your Library’s Web Presence with HTML5
    10:45am — E4: Digitizing Legal History
    10:45am — E5: Scanning the Future: QR Codes in Law Libraries
    1:15pm — CS-SIS Program: Hot Topic: Ebooks
    2:45pm — G3: The Best of Both Worlds: Blending Online and Face-to-Face Learning in Teaching Legal Research
    2:45pm — G5: Preserving Our Digital Heritage: A Conversation with Jason Scott
    2:45pm — CS-SIS Roundtable: ‘What’s it All About, Techie?’ Does Educational Technology Help Law Students Learn the Law?
    5:45pm — CS-SIS Program Planning Meeting

    Tuesday, July 24

    7:00am — CS-SIS Breakfast and Business Meeting
    10:15am — I2: Cool Tools Cafe

  • 2011 Philadelphia, PA

    Saturday, July 23

    8:00am — W2: Putting the ‘M’ in ERM: Best Practices in Electronic Resources Management
    7:00pm — Joint Reception of the TS/OBS/RIPS/CS SISs

    Sunday, July 24

    1:30pm — CS-SIS Program: Cool Tools Cafe
    3:00pm — CS-SIS Program: The Challenges and Opportunities of Establishing an Open Source Institutional Repository
    4:15pm — C3: Battledecks AALL
    5:30pm — CS-SIS Program Planning Meeting
    9:00pm — CS-SIS: Karaoke with Ken

    Monday, July 25

    8:45am — D3: The New Collaboration Tools: Let’s Work Together!
    10:00am — CS-SIS Program: Hot Topic: Libraries Developing Openly
    10:45am — F3: “Friending” the Courts: Grappling with Social Networking in Litigation and the Justice System
    2:15pm — G3: Assessing Assistive Technology Usability and Its Effect on the Digital Divide
    5:30pm — CS-SIS Meeting: Blogger’s Get Together

    Tuesday, July 26

    7:15am — CS-SIS Breakfast Business Meeting and Awards
    9:00am — H3: Coding Potpourri: A Survey of Programming Languages and Tools Used in Library Applications Today
    10:45am — I3: E-books and the Future of Legal Publishing
    1:00pm — J3: Capturing Your Local Area Legal History: A Snapshot in Time
    3:15pm — K3: Mobile Applications: Filtering Through the Junk

  • 2010 Denver, CO

    Saturday, July 10

    9:00am — Lawberry Camp
    7:00pm — TS/OBS/RIPS/CS-SIS Joint Reception

    Sunday, July 11

    12:00pm — CS-SIS Program: Cool Tools Cafe
    1:30pm — A6: “I Read the News Today, Oh Boy!”: 21st Century Lessons for Law Libraries from the Recording and Newspaper Industries
    5:30pm — CS-SIS Program Planning Meeting

    Monday, July 12

    8:45am — D6: Research Guides 2.0: Creating Guides that Patrons Love with Less Hassle
    10:45am — F4: Beyond Wayback: Preserving Born-Digital Ephemera
    12:00pm — CS-SIS Roundtable Discussion on Preserving Born-Digital Ephemera
    4:00pm — CS-SIS Program: Database Ownership: Myth or Reality?
    5:00pm — CS-SIS Blogger’s Get Together
    9:30pm — Karaoke with Ken

    Tuesday, July 13

    7:15am — CS-SIS Breakfast Business Meeting and Awards
    9:00am — H1: The Economics of Interface: Vendors Respond
    10:45am — I4: Turning the Page: e-Book Readers in Law Libraries
    2:15pm — J2: Going Mobile: New Tools to Keep Your Library’s Information Moving

  • 2009 Washington, D.C.

    Saturday, July 25

    8:30am — W-1 Cool Tools: The Workshop
    3:00pm — Lawberry Camp
    3:30pm — OBS/TS/CS-SIS NISO Training Session
    7:00pm — TS/OBS/RIPS/CS-SIS Joint Reception

    Sunday, July 26

    12:00pm — CS-SIS Program: Reception for Web 2.0 Challengers
    1:30pm — A-1: Making Your ILS Web 2.0 Happy
    1:30pm — A-2: Beyond Copyright? How License Agreements and Digital Rights Management Pose Challenges to Fair Use and the Provision of Electronic or Media Services
    4:15pm — C-1: Network Neutrality: The Debate Over the Internet Superhighway
    5:30pm — CS-SIS Hot Topic: Blogger Connie Crosby on Why Librarians Should Care About Emerging Technologies

    Monday, July 27

    8:45am — D-1: I Want My Web 2.0: Lessons from the Web 2.0 Challenge Everyone Can Use (or “Get Your MySpace for Nothing and Your RSS for Free”)
    10:45am — CS-SIS Program: Mashing Up the White House
    12:00pm — CS-SIS Open Program Planning Meeting 2010

    4:00pm — G-2: Unmasking a Marvel of an Idea in D.C.: How Graphic Literature Can Be Supertools for Law Librarians
    4:00pm — G-4: WYDSIWYG: What You Don’t See Is What You Get
    5:30pm — Bloggers Get Together
    7:30pm — Karaoke with Ken

    Tuesday, July 28

    7:00am — CS-SIS Breakfast, Business Meeting and Awards
    9:00am — H-2: Web 2.0: Driving Innovation in the Law Firm Library
    3:30pm — K-1: Vlogging for Law Libraries

  • 2008 Portland, OR

    Saturday, July 12

    7:00pm — TS/OBS/RIPS/CS-SIS Joint Reception
    9:30pm — CS-SIS Karaoke 2008

    Sunday, July 13

    12:00pm — CS-SIS Roundtable on Publicizing Your Library with Technology
    4:15pm — C-3: Explore the Real World in Real Time: Making Legal News on JURIST

    Monday, July 14

    9:45am — E-5: Exploring Relevancy Ranking Systems in Search Engines on the Web and in our OPACs: What They Are–How They Work
    10:45am — F-5: Evolving Legal Education: Adding Law Practice Technology to the Curriculum
    12:00pm — CS-SIS Roundtable on Teaching with Technology: Best Practices
    4:00pm — CS-SIS Hot Topic I: Keeping Up With Technology: Advice for Librarians
    5:30pm — CS-SIS Hot Topic II: Using LAMP to Shine a Light on Open Source Applications in a Library Setting

    Tuesday, July 15

    7:00am — CS-SIS Breakfast and Business Meeting
    9:00am — Cool Tools: Energizing Law Librarianship with Web 2.0
    10:45am — I-2:Energize! Teleporting to Second Life: Exploring the Legal and Library Communities in a Virtual World
    12:00pm — CS-SIS Program Planning Meeting 2008-2009
    2:45pm — J-1: Life on a Stick: Traveling Light with Portable Applications

  • 2007 New Orleans, LA

    Saturday, July 14

    8:00am — W3: How (and What) to Podcast
    5:00pm — CS-SIS Executive Board Meeting
    7:00pm — TS/OBS/RIPS/CS-SIS Joint Reception
    9:30pm — Karaoke Night

    Sunday, July 15

    12:00pm — CS-SIS Roundtable on Web Design and Maintenance
    5:30pm — CS-SIS Business Meeting

    Monday, July 16

    8:45pm — CS-SIS Playtime: Hands-On Exploration of Presentation Gadgets and Software
    11:45am — CS-SIS Roundtable on Organizing Legal Databases on Library Web Sites
    5:15pm — CS-SIS Hot Topic: The Intersection of Web 2.0 and Libraries

    Tuesday, July 17

    7:00am — CS-SIS Breakfast Meeting
    12:00pm — CS-SIS Program Planning Meeting 2007-2008
    2:45pm — I-1: Step Away from the Podium! Tips, Tricks and Technologies for Energizing Training Sessions and Legal Research Classes
    3:30pm — J-5 The E-book Report: Using Electronic Books in Your Law Library

  • 2006 St. Louis, MO

    Saturday, July 8

    Sat. 7/8 6:00pm — TS/OBS/RIPS/CS-SIS Joint Reception
    Sat. 7/8 8:30pm — Karaoke Night Out 2006

    Sunday, July 9

    Sun. 7/9 11:45am — CS-SIS Web Development Meeting
    Sun. 7/9 4:15pm — C-2: Let’s All Wiki Wiki! Creative Uses for Wikis in Any Library
    Sun. 7/9 5:30pm — CS-SIS Business Meeting

    Monday, July 10

    Mon. 7/10 7:00am — CS-SIS Breakfast Meeting
    Mon. 7/10 10:15am — CS-SIS Roundtable 1: Organizing Legal Databases on Library Websites
    Mon. 7/10 2:00pm — E-3: Invasion of the Podcast People: Podcasting for the Law Library with Fred Barnhart, John Mayer, and James Milles
    Mon. 7/10 5:15pm — CS-SIS Program Planning Meeting

    Tuesday, July 11

    Tue. 7/11 11:45am — CS-SIS Roundtable 2: Web Site Design & Maintenance
    Tue. 7/11 4:00pm — H-5: Managing Beyond the Library: Successful Management of IT Departments for Law Librarians

    Wednesday, July 12

    Wed. 7/12 2:15pm — K-2: Beyond Google: Hot New and Specialty Search Engines

  • 2004 Boston, MA

    Sunday, July 11

    5:30pm — CS-SIS Business Meeting

  • 2003 Seattle, WA

    Sunday, July 13

    5:30pm — CS-SIS Business Meeting