Handouts & Guides

2014 Instructional Resources Kit

  • Administrative Law Research Guide

    Becka Rich
    Senior Associate Director
    3305 College Avenue
    Davie, FL 33314
    richr@nsu.law.nova.edu

    I use this guide in teaching Advanced Legal Research and also in sessions in Administrative Law classes.  It is designed to be a quick reference guide for sources of Florida and federal administrative law, after having covered how to research them more extensively.

  • Cost Effective Legal Research Guide

    Carol B. Mundorf
    Manager, Training Services
    Ballard Spahr LLP
    300 East Lombard Street
    Baltimore, MD 21202

    We conduct research orientation programs for each class of Summer and Fall Associates.   At these sessions, we explain how what they do in a Lexis or Westlaw research session results in the costs that appear on a client’s bill.  We also tell them about alternative legal research sources (i.e., Fastcase, Intelliconnect, BNA, our print collection, etc.) that they can use without generating costs.

    The handout entitled “2013 Cost Effective Legal Research Choices” was distributed at the orientation for our 2013 Summer and Fall Associates.   It lists various research tasks and sources in chart form (for example, finding research already done on your topic, reading an unannotated statute, learning if a case is good law, etc.) to indicate whether a given source is a good and cost effective choice for a given research task.  The goal of this handout is to help new hires make sense of the information we give them about costs and research sources.

    Thanks to Gwen Friedman, Dave Webster, and David Proctor of the Research & Information Center at Ballard Spahr LLP for the helpful comments they made during the development of this handout.

  • Legal Research Guides

    Ashley Ames Ahlbrand
    Education Technology & Reference Librarian
    Indiana University Maurer School of Law
    211 S. Indiana Ave.
    Bloomington, IN 47405
    aaahlbra@indiana.edu

    Jennifer Bryan Morgan
    Documents Librarian, Associate Librarian and Lecturer in Law
    Indiana University Maurer School of Law
    211 S. Indiana Ave.
    Bloomington, IN 47405
    jlbryan@indiana.edu 

    These research guides were created to accompany the law librarians’ lectures in the Legal Research & Writing program at Indiana University Maurer School of Law.  The guides are designed to demonstrate the purpose each type of legal material – statutes, cases, and secondary sources – plays in legal research and the methods for finding each.  Guidance is provided for using these materials on Lexis Advance, WestlawNext, Bloomberg Law, and to some extent in print.  The guides were created using the LibGuides platform and are freely accessible.  Their content is updated regularly to reflect changes in the legal research databases.

  • Online Legal Research Handout

    Ingrid Mattson
    Reference Librarian & Adjunct Professor
    Moritz Law Library
    Drinko Hall Room 280E
    55 West 12th Avenue
    Columbus, OH 43210
    mattson.30@osu.edu

    This handout originally accompanied a presentation on the Fundamentals of Online Legal Research. However, because the handout was intended to supplement the presentation rather than allow the audience to follow along, the handout could be used in any circumstance where a patron needs basic search strategy advice and some starting points for his or her online research. The handout is comprised of three sets of information. The first includes definitions of natural language and Boolean searching and illustrates how the two search approaches compare. It also provides links to websites that will enable the audience-member to learn more if they are advanced users or help them along if they are just learning. The second part identifies resources for online legal research and articles to provide more information. The third part identifies resources for general online research and articles to provide more information.

  • Preemption Checklist

    Melanie Knapp
    Head of Reference and Instructional Services
    George Mason University Law Library
    3301 Fairfax Drive, MSN 1G1
    Arlington, VA 22201-4426
    Tel: (703) 993-8111

    Our rising second year students begin preparations to write a note or comment for their journals in the summer. They receive research training from journal staff and vendor representatives at their journal orientation. So far, we haven’t convinced them to invite librarians. Instead, we developed a Scholarly Writing & Spading research guide for them. We post this preemption checklist there to give them direction and structure in ensuring that their chosen topic has not been covered already in the literature. Presumably, they should consult each of the resources on the checklist, and then check it off the list.

  • Research Checklist

    Melanie Knapp
    Head of Reference and Instructional Services
    George Mason University Law Library
    3301 Fairfax Drive, MSN 1G1
    Arlington, VA 22201-4426
    Tel: (703) 993-8111

    This checklist serves two purposes for our candidate journal members who are writing notes and comments: (1) to organize for them a list of useful resources generally relied upon for scholarly research; (2) to memorialize the resources they cover in individual meetings with librarians concerning their particular topics.

    I provide a lecture on useful resources for all journal students in their Scholarly Writing class. In addition, each student is required to meet individually with a librarian to discuss his or her research for the required note or comment. My lecture follows the outline of this checklist. Then, when students meet with a librarian, the librarian uses the checklist, highlighting useful resources as they are discussed, “x-ing” out any resources that aren’t useful to the particular student’s note or comment, and providing any unique or special resources that the student will find helpful for the particular note or comment by adding them to the checklist. The students leave the meeting with a structured checklist of materials to consult. We find that many students have already been working with the checklist before their meeting with the librarian. This enables the student and librarian to focus on any particular difficulties the student is having.