Education & Training

AALL Annual Meeting

The LHRB-SIS programs, meetings & events at the AALL Annual Meeting.

  • 2017 Austin, TX

    Sunday, July 16

    LHRB-SIS Morris L. Cohen Essay Presentation by Gonzalo Rodriguez, “Protecting Inland Waterways, from the Institutes of Gaius to Magna Carta.”

    12:45 p.m.-2:00 p.m. (Hilton 417B), Sponsored by Gale Cengage Learning

    LHRB-SIS Business Meeting

    5:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. (ACC 5C)

    LHRB-SIS Reception at Threadgill’s (301 W. Riverside Dr.)

    7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m., Sponsored by HeinOnline

    Monday, July 17

    LHRB-SIS Host City History Roundtable, Tequila and the Law, with Mark Podvia and Scott Willis, Founder of Tequila 512

    3:30 p.m.-4:45 p.m. (ACC 9B)

    LHRB-SIS Rare Books Cataloging Round Table

    5:00 p.m.-6:30 p.m. (Hilton 416B)

    LHRB-SIS Archives Round Table

    5:00 p.m.-6:30 p.m. (Hilton 416B)

    Tuesday, July 18

    Spanish and English Water Law in the American Southwest

    11:00 a.m.-noon (ACC 16AB)
    Moderator: Laura Ray
    Speakers: Jane Cohen, Edward Clark Centennial Professor of Law, UT Austin
    Charles Porter, Visiting Professor, St. Edward’s  University

  • 2016 Chicago, IL

    Sunday, July 17

    Morris L. Cohen Essay Presentation

    12:45 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. (Hyatt-Soldier Field)
    This year’s Legal History and Rare Books SIS’s Morris L. Cohen Student Essay Competition winner was Jillian Slaight, a doctoral student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Jillian gave a great talk about the research and writing behind her winning essay, “Seductive Arguments: Law, Elopement & the Erosion of Parental Authority in Pre-Revolutionary France.” Throughout the early modern period, French law forbade unsanctioned marriages between minors, a crime classified as “seduction.” Men who wed without the consent of their bride’s parents faced the potential of capital punishment. From the 1760s until the eve of the Revolution, defense lawyers wielded the legal brief as a powerful instrument of public opinion, transforming seduction cases into referendums on paternal power – and, by extension, the power of the monarchy itself. Yet these same legal discourses constrained female happiness to the realm of marriage.

    LHRB-SIS Business Meeting

    5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. (Hyatt-Toronto)
    We had a productive business meeting, led by Chair Kasia Solon Cristobal. Minutes will circulate on the listserv. The business meeting was followed by a reception at Quartino Ristorante.

    Monday, July 18

    The Once and Future Presidential Library: From Lincoln to Obama

    9:45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m. (Hyatt-Columbus EF)
    Here we are in Chicago, Illinois — the land of Lincoln and the “Sweet Home” of which President Obama sings. These two presidents have become indelibly linked. How will their physical legacies compare? Everything related to Lincoln is now considered worth preserving, yet the federal presidential library system only came later. How does access compare for the more remote Lincoln versus the more immediate Obama? How much can even be preserved — will we get to see what Obama emailed on his not one, but two, BlackBerries?

    Our speakers gave insights on the answers to these questions, along with thoughts on the newest presidential library, from its location and design to the logistics of processing materials prior to their release to researchers.

    The speakers in this LHRB-sponsored program were Olivia Mahoney, Senior Curator at the Chicago History Museum; Blair Kamin, Columnist and Architecture Critic at the Chicago Tribune; John Laster, Diector, Presidential Materials Division, at the National Archives and Records Administration; and Kasia Solon Cristobal, Lecturer & Reference Librarian (Student Services Coordinator) at the University of Texas, Jamil Center for Legal Research.

    LHRB-SIS Host City History Roundtable
    Baseball, Ballots, and Bombs: Why Chicago’s Legal History Still Resonates

    3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m. (Hyatt-Columbian)
    This talk took attendees on a whirlwind trip through (just some) of the Windy City’s colorful legal history! AALL members Mike Maben and Scott Burgh talked about their research into the 1919 Black Sox Scandal, the 1880 stolen aldermanic election in the 14th Ward, and the Haymarket Executive Clemency Campaign. It’s sports, politics, and law – the Chicago Way.

    LHRB-SIS Archives Roundtable

    5:00 p.m – 6:30 p.m. (Hyatt-Dusable)

    LHRB-SIS Rare Book Cataloging Roundtable

    5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. (Hyatt-Skyway 272)

  • 2015 Philadelphia, PA

    SUNDAY, JULY 19

    LHRB-SIS Morris L. Cohen Essay Presentation

    11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. (PCC Room 111A)
    Sung Yup Kim, our 2014 Morris Cohen Essay Contest winner, will present the winning paper “Those Innumerable Litigations of a Civil Nature Arising among the Lower Sort,” Justices of the Peace and Small Debt Litigation in Late Colonial New York.  Feel free to bring a brown-bag lunch, and enjoy this annual recognition of blossoming legal historians.

    LHRB-SIS Business Meeting

    5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. (Room 305 of the Marriott)

    LHRB-SIS Reception

    7:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. (McGillin’s Olde Ale House)

    MONDAY, JULY 20

    The LHRB-SIS Host City History Roundtable

    3:15 p.m.-4:30 p.m. (PCC Room 104B)
    This year’s Roundtable will feature Regina Smith, Executive Director of the Jenkins Law Library, and John Van Horne, Director Emeritus of The Library Company of Philadelphia, who will discuss how the evolution of their libraries can serve as a blueprint for successfully adapting to economic and technological changes.

    LHRB-SIS Rare Book Cataloging Roundtable

    4:30 p.m. -5:30  p.m. (Marriott Room 304)

    TUESDAY, JULY 21

    Researching the Corpus Juris Civilis

    12:30 p.m.-2 p.m. (PCC Room 105A)
    LHRB-SIS and the FCIL-SIS Roman Law Interest Group

    “Voices from the Past:  Using Rare and Antiquarian Books in the Modern Practice of Law.”

    4 p.m.-5 p.m. (PCC 204BC)
    Speakers will be Mark W. Podvia, Head of Public Services and Instruction Librarian, West Virginia University College of Law; Michael von der Linn, Antiquarian Book Department Manager, Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.; and Charles E. Shields, III, Attorney-At-Law, The Law Office of Shields and Houck.

    Materials for this session include:

  • 2014 San Antonio, TX

    SUNDAY, JULY 13

    Morris L. Cohen Essay Presentation and Luncheon

    11:45 a.m.-1:00 p.m. (HBGCC Room 206A)
    The winner of this year’s competition is Bonnie Shucha, Assistant Director of Public Services at the University of Wisconsin Law Library, discussed her winning essay, “White Slavery in the Northwoods: Early Sex Trafficking and the Reformation of Law in the Late Nineteenth Century.”  Emily Ulrich, a graduate student in the Medieval Studies Program at Yale, wrote the runner-up essay, ” ‘Commoning’ the English Common Law Treatise: Investigating Three Fourteenth-Century Copies of the Britton”. Congratulations to Bonnie and Emily!

    B4: The Accidental Archivist: Creating Archives on a Shoestring Budget

    4:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. (HBGCC Room 217A)
    Walked participants through the process of evaluating unprocessed archival materials held by their libraries and showed how to set achievable goals for such collections with minimal outlay

    Rare Book Cataloging Roundtable

    5:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. (HBGCC Room 210B)
    Catalogers brought their rare book cataloging conundrums, believe-it-or-nots, and candidates for the cataloging Odditorium to the roundtable for informal discussion at “the” expert law catalogers forum.

    MONDAY, JULY 14

    Host City History: San Antonio Edition

    11:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m. (HBGCC Room 213A)
    LHRB’s first annual legal history meeting. Our guest, Professor Michael Ariens of St. Mary’s University School of Law in San Antonio, and the author of the award-winning Lone Star Law: A Legal History of Texas, led a discussion/Q&A on Texas legal history.  The lively session was followed by a Lone Star Law booksigning.

    H1: The Civil Rights Act of 1964: Celebrating Its 50th Anniversary (sponsored by LHRB-SIS)

    3:45 p.m.-4:45 p.m. (HBGCC Room 217A)
    The Civil Rights Act of 1964, celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2014, is considered one of the most important laws in United States history. The act ended the segregation of public accommodations in the South, established the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to handle all types of employee discrimination, and created a mechanism to desegregate the public schools by cutting off federal funding to noncomplying school districts. This illuminating session reviewed the legislative process in the passage of this act, and discussed President Lyndon Johnson’s intimate role in that passage.

    Coordinator & Moderator: Joel Fishman, Duquesne University Center for Legal Information/Allegheny County Law Library; Speaker: Sanford V. Levinson, University of Texas School of Law at Austin

    Business Meeting

    5:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. (HBGCC Room 216A)

    LHRB reception at Manhattan Mexican Restaurant

    7:00p.m.-8:30 p.m.

  • 2013 Seattle, WA

    Sunday, July 14

    Morris L. Cohen Essay Presentation and Luncheon

    12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
    Winner: Sarah Levine-Gronningsater, PhD Candidate in American History at the University of Chicago, “Louis Napoleon’s Secret Service: Gradual Emancipation, Antislavery Legal Culture, and the Origins of the Lemmon Slave Case (1852-60)”

    Runner-up: Matthew Axtell, PhD Candidate in History at Princeton University, “Customs of the River: Legal Change and Shifting Hydrology in the 19-Century Steamboat Economy” (available on SSRN). Matthew presented his essay at the 2013 AALL Annual meeting in Seattle.

    Monday, July 15

    Law Libraries and Advocacy: Using Special Collections to Tell the Story of the Japanese American Internment

    1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
    This program delved into the legal history of the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, a topic of broad interest to those concerned with civil rights and also of historic relevance to the Seattle area. In particular, attendees learned the remarkable story of the 1980s litigation that successfully vacated the convictions of Fred T. Korematsu and Gordon Hirabayashi, who challenged the legality of the military orders that lead to the internment. The program illustrated the ways that law librarians can become involved in telling the story of successful advocacy to right social injustice. It discussed the work of local law school librarians who created major exhibits in collaboration with Japanese American families, members of legal teams, community activists, libraries and other institutions, as well as faculty and departments across the university. Those exhibits brought people into the library, educated students, and solidified a collaborative relationship between the library and one of the school’s key advocacy centers.

    Stacy Etheredge, Co-coordinator and Co-moderator, West Virginia University College of Law; Etheldra G. Scoggin, Co-coordinator and Co-moderator, Loyola University College of Law Library; Lori Bannai, Seattle University School of Law Library; and Stephanie Wilson, Seattle University School of Law Library.

    LHRB Annual Business Meeting

    5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
    One important item was the approval of a proposed amendment to the LHRB-SIS bylaws. The adopted amendment clarifies that it is permissible (but not mandatory) for the Secretary-Treasurer to serve for consecutive terms. The thinking of the Executive Committee is that there is a learning curve for mastering the AALL financial bureaucracy, and it is a shame to toss out the experience gained after only one term, and start the process all over again.

    LHRB Reception

    7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. (Palomino Restaurant)

  • 2012 Boston, MA

    The Legal History & Rare Books SIS has a great line up for you at the 2012 AALL Annual Meeting in Boston. We’ll start off easy with our LHRB Luncheon on Sunday, July 22nd, 12noon-1pm, in HCC Room 203. Reconnect with colleagues and hear from Zoey Orol, the second-place winner of our 2012 Morris Cohen Student Essay Contest. Ms. Orol is a 2L student at New York University School of Law, and she will present Reading the Early American Legal Profession: A Study of the First American Law Review. John Beerbower, a 3L student at the University of Virginia School of Law, wrote the first-place essay, but, unfortunately, is unable to attend the AALL Meeting. However, as with all Cohen Student Essay Contest winners, he has been invited to submit his essay, Ex Parte McCardle and the Attorney General’s Duty to Defend Acts of Congress, to AALL’s LAW LIBRARY JOURNAL.

    Finish up your Sunday with our LHRB SIS Business Meeting 5:15pm-6:30pm in the Sheraton-Independence Ballroom East. This is where you’ll hear the latest on – and have the opportunity to get involved in – our SIS organizational activities and programing plans for the 2013 AALL Annual Meeting in Seattle.

    Monday, July 23rd, will be a whirlwind morning! 8:30am-9:45am, in HCC Room 306, The Law of the Salem Witch Trials will examine the substantive and procedural laws regulating witchcraft trials in the late 17th century, and how they were applied in the Massachusetts Colony during the Salem trials. Speakers will be Lawrence Ross, Head of Instructional and Media Services, and Karen Wahl, Reference/Legal History & Rare Books Librarian, both at the George Washington University Law School Jacob Burns Law Library, as well as Mark Podvia, Associate Law Librarian and Archivist, Dickinson School of Law of the Pennsylvania State University.

    10:45am-11:45am, in HCC Room 306, Digitizing Legal History will review the creation of the digital archive of litigation documents related to the Mt. Laurel cases, a series of groundbreaking cases on affordable housing in New Jersey regarded as the equivalent of Brown v. Board of Education. Speakers will be Wei Fang, Head of Digital Services, and Susan Lyons, Reference and Government Documents Librarian, both at the Rutgers Law Library (Newark). The LHRB SIS and Micrographics/AudioVisual SISs are co-sponsoring this Computer Services SIS case-study program.

    12noon-1pm, in HCC Room 206, bring your lunch to “Digging” Legal History in Boston: The Case of the Boston Strangler, a fascinating discussion of the re-autopsy of Mary Sullivan, the Strangler’s purported last victim, and Albert DeSalvo, who claimed to be the Strangler. Coordinated by Jennie Meade, Director of Special Collections, George Washington University Jacob Burns Law Library, this program will feature the international exhumation expert James Starrs, Professor Emeritus of Law and Forensic Sciences, George Washington University Law School.

    Wait for it… a great way to end this busy Monday! Join your colleagues at the LHRB SIS Reception , 6pm-8:30pm, at the Harvard Law School Library Caspersen Room (1563 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge).

    But we’re still not done. Tuesday, July 24th, 8:30am-9:45am, Early Law Libraries as Historical Documents: Recording the Bookshelves of Long-Ago Lawyers will explain how to analyze a library as a historical document, how to reconstruct a library, and why a library is a powerful and useful collection development tool, as well as demonstrate the Library Thing’s “Libraries of Early America” project. Coordinated and moderated by Michael Widener, Rare Book Librarian, Yale Law School, and our 2012-2013 LHRB SIS Chair, the speakers will be Karen Beck, Historical & Special Collections Manager, Harvard Law School Library; and Jeremy Dibbell, Rare Books & Social Media Librarian, LibraryThing.

    Tired yet? Check out the electronic AALL 2012 Annual Meeting Conference Planner to help plan your time at the meeting. Also, as always, be sure to check the final AALL Program for exact locations of programs and meetings. Looking forward to seeing you in Boston!

  • 2011 Philadelphia, PA

    Sunday, July 24

    LH&RB Roundtable and Luncheon: Morris Cohen Student Essay Contest Paper Presentation

    12:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.

    A-5: Old into New: Collaborative Law Library Digital Collections

    1:30 p.m  – 2:45 p.m.

    LH&RB Business Meeting

    5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. 

    Monday, July 25

    D6: We the People: Constitutional National Treasures in Philadelphia Archives

    8:45 am – 9:45 am

    “Digging Legal History in Philadelphia: The Meriwether Lewis Project

    10:45 am to 11:45 am

    GD-SIS Program: Contemporary State Constitutional Conventions: Proposals for Pennsylvania and Beyond

    8:45am-9:45am
    Not an LH&RB Program, but to be presented by Joel Fishman and Mark Podvia; you will hopefully be attending the We the People program, but you might want to encourage others from your library to attend the GD-SIS program.

  • 2010 Denver, CO

    Sunday, July 11

    LHRB-SIS Business Meeting

    5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
    2010 Business Meeting agenda with proposed bylaw changes and the 2009 minutes

    LHRB-SIS Lunch Roundtable:  “Digging” Colorado Legal History: Alfred Packer – The Man, The Myths, The Cannibal.

    12:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. (CCC-Room 107)
    Professor James E. Starrs of The George Washington University Law School, forensics expert and internationally-known authority on exhumation, returns to AALL to discuss the case of Colorado cannibal Alfred (Alferd) Packer, a member of a February, 1874, gold prospecting party who returned in the spring, well-fed and without his five companions.  Packer was charged at his first trial with murder, not cannibalism, which was not a crime in Colorado, then or now.  He was convicted in 1883.  When his conviction was reversed on a technicality, his retrial resulted in conviction for five crimes of homicide. Professor Starrs led a team of experts in the exhumation of the Packer party members, and will discuss his analysis of the scientific data gleaned from the victims’ bones.  This data undermined Packer’s trial testimony, confirming that Packer had cannibalized all five of his companions, when he had contended that he had cannibalized only two under duress when food ran out.

    LHRB-SIS-Sponsored Educational Program:  B2: Mapping Uncharted Terrains: Introducing Archival Best Practices to the Management of Law School, Court and Law Firm Historical Collections.

    3 p.m.-4 p.m. (CCC-Room 108-112)
    Kurt Metzmeier and Denise Anthony
    Librarians in small and mid-sized law libraries are forced to wear many hats, and one is that of the parent institution’s “archivist.” Many librarians thrust into this role are not trained as archivists and have a hard time discerning the accepted standards for accessioning, processing, preserving, and providing access to these collections. Often these supposed archives are actually a mixture of documents, print ephemera, photographs, digital media and even works of art. This program will introduce the rudiments of archival best practices-giving practical advice on what is an archival collection, what to keep, and how to describe and provide access to archival materials. It will also provide concrete solutions for managing the non-archival materials often lumped into these institutional collections.

    LHRB-SIS Reception / Morris L. Cohen Student Essay Contest Award Ceremony

    7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. (Hyatt-Agate B)
    After our Business Meeting, please join your LHRB-SIS colleagues as we adjourn to a reception at the Hyatt, Room “Agate B”. We will sample hors d’oeuvres and drinks, and celebrate this year’s first- and second-place winners of our SIS’s Morris L. Cohen Student Essay Contest, co-sponsored by LHRB and Gale Publishing. Please join us, even if you did not sign up for an advance “registration count” ticket – it is free and open to all who are interested in the LHRB-SIS or the Morris Cohen Contest. Many thanks to Gale for their support of our award and reception. We hope to see you there!

    Monday, July 10

    LHRB-SIS Co-Sponsored Educational Program:  F4: Beyond Wayback: Preserving Born-Digital Ephemera.

    10:45AM – 11:45AM. (CCC-Room 205-207)
    Jason Eiseman, Richard A. Leiter. Jean-Gabriel Bankier, William LeFurgy
    The Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine provides a great service preserving web sites that many librarians have used for research. Some libraries have even implemented their own versions for archiving digital materials, but new types of internet content have changed the game. Tweets disappear from Twitter’s search within a week and a half after posting. YouTube videos can be taken down as quickly as they are posted. These new forms of digital content are often transient, with no permanent home, promise of preservation, or even plan for long-term data storage. Richard Leiter, host of the Law Librarian Blog Talk Radio Show, will lead a panel discussion on preserving digital ephemera. Preservation experts will discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with archiving data. They will explain preservation efforts already underway, describe tools for preservation, and offer considerations when building collections of digital ephemera.

    LHRB-SIS Roundtable and Luncheon: Morris Cohen Student Essay Contest Paper Presentation

    12:00 PM – 1:15 PM (Hyatt-Agate BC)
    Join us for lunch and a chance to hear Justin Simard, the winner of the Morris L. Cohen Student Essay Contest, deliver his paper, “‘The Citadel Must Open Its Gates to the People: Judicial Reform at the 1821 New York Constitutional Convention.”

  • 2009 Washington, D.C.

    Sunday, July 26

    B-5: Lincoln, the Law, and Libraries

    3 p.m. – 4 p.m.
    Celebrate the bicentennial of Abraham Lincoln’s birth by exploring his connection to modern libraries. The speakers will present an in-depth look at several important resources for Lincoln’s original documents and papers. First, the panel will examine a traditional resource for historical research, the archival collection, with a behind-the-scenes look at the Lincoln Manuscripts at the Library of Congress. Next, they will describe the Lincoln Legal Papers Project, which has produced two seminal reference works providing contemporary researchers with both print and electronic access to Lincoln’s legal materials. Finally, the speakers will share their expertise and insight into the complex processes involved in developing and maintaining their collections of historical documents and ensuring access to the materials in various formats. This program will provide librarians with a unique perspective on the Lincoln legacy and its role in our profession.

    Stacy Etheredge, Co-coordinator and Co-moderator, University of Richmond Law Library
    Etheldra G. Scoggin, Co-coordinator and Co-moderator, Loyola University College of Law Library
    John R. Sellers, Library of Congress
    Daniel W. Stowell, The Papers of Abraham Lincoln

    LHRB-SIS Business Meeting

    5:30 p.m. -6:30 p.m.
    Join your friends in the LHRB-SIS as we meet and greet, wrap up the year’s activities and events, and begin planning for next year.

    LHRB-SIS Reception / Morris L. Cohen Student Essay Contest Award Ceremony

    7 p.m. – 9 p.m.
    George Washington University Law Library (directions)
    After our Business Meeting, please join your LHRB-SIS colleagues as we adjourn to a reception at the George Washington University Law Library, a short Metro ride from the Convention Center. We will sample hors d’oeuvres and drinks, and celebrate the first winner of our SIS’s new Morris L. Cohen Student Essay Contest, co-sponsored by LHRB and Gale Publishing. If you plan to join us, please RSVP on the Annual Meeting’s Registration Form so that we can get an accurate head count for planning purposes. Many thanks to Gale, and to our hosts, Scott Pagel and Jennie Meade of GWU. We hope to see you there!

    Monday, July 27

    LHRB-SIS Roundtable and Luncheon: Presentation of Winning Cohen Student Essay Contest Paper (tentative)

    12 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
    Join us for lunch and a chance to hear the first winner of the Morris L. Cohen Student Essay Contest deliver his or her paper (tentative – depending on the student’s availability).

    Tuesday, July 28

    J-1: “Digging” Legal History: Using Exhumation and Innovative Forensic Science Techniques to Verify Historical Legal Events

    2:30 p.m. -3:15 p.m.
    Forensic science, the application of science to the law, is a vital tool for determining the likely scenario of a past event. Physical evidence, such as bones, hair or body fluids, obtained during exhumation, can provide the forensic scientist with adequate proof to postulate with a high degree of accuracy the sequence of occurrences associated with a past event, such as an unusual death or suspected murder. Professor James Starrs, a leading expert on the use of forensics in the courtroom, will examine how modern forensic science techniques, unavailable or unutilized at the time of the events in question, can alter or confirm recorded legal history. Starrs will illustrate his presentation with examples from some of the many re-investigations of cases he has handled involving exhumation of historical figures, including Louisiana Senator Huey Long’s alleged assassin, Dr. Carl Weiss, and CIA scientist Frank Olson, whose mysterious 1953 death was characterized by the U.S. government as a suicide.

    Jennie C. Meade, Coordinator and Moderator, George Washington University, Jacob Burns Law Library
    James E. Starrs, George Washington University Law School

  • 2008 Portland, OR

    Saturday, July 12

    Workshop W-2: What’s in this Box? Managing Archive Collections (Sponsored by TS-SIS and cosponsored by LHRB-SIS)

    This one-day workshop has two discrete parts. The morning session will focus on managing archival collections, including: discussion of what is an archival collection and who should manage them; effectively arranging and describing collections; creating finding aids; providing physical and intellectual access to these types of materials; and managing collections electronically. In the afternoon session we will cover Encoded Archival Description (EAD) – the accepted standard for encoding the descriptive information found in archival finding aids, which enables researchers to locate and use finding aids electronically. Participants will receive basic instruction in marking up finding aids with EAD tags, and will mark up finding aids with EAD tags in a hands-on exercise.  Speakers include Janice Anderson, Heather Bourke, Lori Lindberg, Anne Mar, Bill Sleeman and Mike Widener.

    Sunday July 13

    LHRB-SIS Program: Law Library Journal at 100: The Evolution of a Publication

    1:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.

    Law Library Journal is publishing its 100th volume in 2008. To mark this milestone, several former LLJ editors and a former business manager will discuss the Journal, its history and development, and its importance to the law library profession. The informal roundtable discussion will intersperse serious information about the Journal and its contribution to the literature of our profession with interesting (and maybe even humorous) anecdotes from LLJ’s long history. Panelists include former LLJ Editors Frank Houdek and Dick Danner, and former Business Manager Pat Kehoe.

    B-6: Beer and the Law: A Legal History of Beer, Brewing and Government Regulation from the German Purity Law to the Microbrew Movement

    3 p.m. – 4 p.m.

    To commemorate Portland’s status as a microbrew haven, come explore the legal history of its most famous beverage: beer! From the German Purity Law of 1516 to Prohibition, beer has been among the most heavily regulated beverages. This program will examine the history of beer with a special emphasis on the laws and regulations that have governed the industry. Attendees will also learn about the brewing process from one of Portland’s master brewers from Full Sail Brewing Company.

    LHRB-SIS Business Meeting

    5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
    Join your friends in the LHRB-SIS as we meet and greet, wrap up the year’s activities and events, and begin planning for next year.

    LHRB-SIS Reception at Lucky Labrador Brew Pub

    7 p.m. – 9 p.m.
    Portland is a haven for microbreweries. Join the LHRB-SIS as we cap off our “Beer in the Law” program and our Business Meeting by sampling some of Portland’s finest concoctions at the Lucky Lab Brew Pub. We’ll gather in the private party room, where our own bartender will serve three of Lucky Lab’s most popular beers. Snacks and up to two beers per guest will be provided compliments of the LHRB-SIS. A little over a mile from the Oregon Convention Center, Lucky Lab is located at 915 S.E. Hawthorne Blvd., a quick trolley ride away. If you plan to join us, please RSVP on the Annual Meeting’s Registration Form so that we can get an accurate head count for planning purposes. Hope to see you there!

    Monday, July 14

    Program F-6: Oregon’s Death with Dignity Act: A Legal History (cosponsored by SR-SIS)

    10:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
    Although end-of-life issues continue to be highly controversial, public opinion has made a significant shift during the past ten years in support of individual choice for end-of-life treatment. Oregon became the only state to authorize physician-assisted death when it passed The Death with Dignity Act (DWDA) in 1994. This unique statute and Oregon’s experience serve as a model for other states as they attempt to resolve the conflicting interests and establish public policy on these issues. The DWDA has survived a number of legal challenges since it was first enacted. In this program the panel will address: the legislative history of Oregon’s Death with Dignity Act, the ensuing lawsuits, and attempts to repeal the law; the key provisions of the DWDA; federal challenges to the Oregon law, both in Congress and in the courts; Oregon’s experience during the 10 years since the statute went into effect; and the impact and ramifications of the DWDA.

    LHRB-SIS Roundtable: Evolution of a Research and Legal History Web Site: From Funding Through Implementation

    12 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
    Join us for lunch and hear Joel Fishman discuss the formation of the Pennsylvania Constitution Website at Duquesne University. He will demonstrate the website and describe how to obtain funding to start a similar project. This website is the only one in the country to offer both historical and current information dealing with state constitutional law and history. A site like this can be an important research and historical resource for the legal community, scholars, students and the general public. Dr. Joel Fishman is the Co-Director of the Pennsylvania Constitution Website. He has posted all constitutions, historical treatises, digests, attorneys-general opinions and more on the site, and has obtained $18,000 in grants for the project. Light lunch will be provided.

    Tuesday, July 15

    Program K-5: Explore the new World of Legal History Research – Be Prepared to Wiki!

    3:30 p.m. – 4 p.m.
    As the interests of faculty members become more interdisciplinary, more of them are writing about legal history. But legal history is no longer just a matter of looking at old cases. Researchers need to access newspapers and archival materials to develop their theses more fully. How can law librarians keep up with the new resources coming on line in this fascinating field? This program will get you started and keep you on top of a new expanding field of scholarly research. First we will focus on both traditional legal history resources, such as subscription databases, and on non-traditional sources, such as Google Books, to show you how to find what your researchers want. Next, we examine what kinds of materials your researchers want and why. Finally, we show you how to put it all together and keep it up to date by using elements of Web 2.0 and posting a dynamic legal history wiki.

  • 2007 New Orleans, LA

    Sunday, July 15

    A-6 Taking Up the Gauntlet: The Duel in Southern Legal History

    1:15 p.m.

    Level: Introductory 75 Minutes
    Competency: Reference, Research and Patron Services
    Target Audience: Academic librarians and others interested in legal history and rare books
    Learning Outcomes:
    1) Participants will be able to explain the practice of dueling in history and its development from a legal to an illegal institution.
    2) Participants will be able to discuss why the duel was significant in Southern culture and how legal and cultural factors caused its demise.

    New Orleans was considered the most active dueling venue in 19th century America, where as many as 12 duels were fought under the Dueling Oaks in one day.Why did people engage in dueling, and what were the legal and social results? Why was dueling mostly confined to the South? How could an illegal activity continue unchecked by the law over the course of generations? The duel originally was a legal means of dispute resolution in early Europe; the judicial duel evolved into the duel of chivalry, and ultimately,
    to the duel of honor. Professor Bertram Wyatt-Brown, a leading historian of the American South, will discuss the history of the duel, how the duel of honor became entrenched in Southern culture, why it flourished, and how it died.

    Jennie C. Meade, Coordinator and Moderator, George Washington University, Jacob Burns Law Library Bertram Wyatt-Brown, Johns Hopkins University

    Monday, July 16

    D-6 Rome: The Power of Film to Teach Foundations of Roman and Civil Law

    8:45 a.m.
    Level: Intermediate 90 Minutes
    Competency: Reference, Research and Patron Services
    Target Audience: Individuals using audiovisual materials to enhance education, as well as librarians and legal professionals interested in Roman or civil law
    Learning Outcomes:
    1) Participants will be able to explain how audiovisual materials can facilitate the achievement of complex learning objectives.
    2) Participants will be able to identify Roman and historical civil law elements.

    Legal and historical scholars have long recognized Roman law
    foundations in European and other civil law systems, as well as the importance of the Roman Monarchy and Republic legal institutions and procedures in the development of classical Roman law. This program will demonstrate the educational opportunities afforded by audiovisual materials, as it draws upon the powerful images of the HBO series Rome, to explain key elements of Roman Law. It will review the relationship between, and government powers of, Senators,
    Consuls, Praetors, Magistrates, Tribunes and other officials, as well as law-making authority and procedures, election procedures, the court system, trial proceedings and emergency government procedures.

    Laura E. Ray, Coordinator, Cleveland State University, Cleveland Marshall College of Law Library
    Bernard Keith Vetter, Loyola University College of Law Library
    Co-sponsored by the Micrographics/Audiovisual SIS and Foreign, Comparative & International Law SIS.

    Legal History & Rare Books SIS Roundtable: Celebrating the 400th Anniversary of Cowell’s Interpreter

    11:45 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

    Outcomes: Participants will be able to:
    1.  Describe the history of legal dictionaries from 17th to 20th centuries
    2.  Evaluate the use of legal dictionaries in judicial decisions

    From Chancellor Coke to Justice Scalia, jurists have long resorted to legal dictionaries to fix the meanings of legal terms of art.  Cowell’s Interpreter (1607) was one of the first major English legal dictionaries.  King James I banned the work for its contents countered some of the divine right theory of kings held by him.  The work was later reprinted early in the 18th century.  To celebrate the 400th anniversary of Cowell’s Interpreter, this program will provide a history of legal dictionaries in Anglo-American law and their use in legal literature.  Discussion will highlight Giles Jacobs, John Bouvier, Henry Black, and Bryan Garner, each of whom contributed major dictionaries that have been quoted in a wide variety of legal sources.  Additional focus will be made upon the use of legal versus nonlegal dictionaries and modern linguistic problems associated with the use of dictionaries by current American courts.

    Coordinator and Moderator: Joel Fishman, Assistant Director for Lawyer Services, Duquesne University Center for Legal Information / Allegheny County Law Library.
    Speaker: Warren Billings, Emeritus Professor of History, University of New Orleans

    F-3 Huey Long and the Press: Louisiana’s Contribution to Modern Constitutional Law

    2:00 p.m.
    Level: Introductory 75 Minutes
    Competency: Reference, Research and Patron Services
    Target Audience: All law librarians interested in Louisiana’s legal history or in freedom of the press
    Learning Outcomes:
    1) Participants will be able to trace the development of modern constitutional law regarding freedom of the press.
    2) Participants will review a unique era in Louisiana’s legal history, focusing on one of the state’s most colorful and controversial politicians and his continuing legacy.

    In 1934, Huey Long, then a U.S. Senator from Louisiana, used his local political machine to push through legislation in Louisiana, which taxed advertising in newspapers with weekly circulations of more than 20,000.Widely regarded as an attempt to control and destroy the vocal urban newspapers that were against him and his politics, Long’s action energized a unified press to fight back with a lawsuit. The case, Grosjean v. American Press Co., resulted in a unanimous U.S. Supreme Court decision that ultimately led to a much-expanded concept of the constitutional protection of freedom
    of the press. The program will examine the unique situations and personalities that led to the legislation, as well as the Grosjean case and its influence on the modern development of freedom of the press in the United States.

    Stacy Etheredge, Co-coordinator and Co-moderator, University of South Carolina, Coleman Karesh Law Library
    Etheldra G. Scoggin, Co-coordinator and Co-moderator, Loyola University College of Law Library
    Michael L. Kurtz, Southeastern Louisiana University
    James E. Viator, Loyola University College of Law Library
    Richard D.White, Jr., Louisiana State University

    Tuesday July 17

    Legal History & Rare Books Business Meeting

    4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

  • 2006 St. Louis, MO

    Sunday, July 9

    C-3 Colonial Virginia’s Legal History

    4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
    Virginians made an important contribution to both legal and political thought in American history. Commemorating the 400th anniversary of the founding of Virginia in 2007, this session will offer participants a view of colonial Virginia history from the viewpoint of two distinguished historians. Dr. Warren Billings, one of the leading scholars on 17th century Virginia history, will discuss English influences on legal thought of the era. Dr. David Konig, an expert on Anglo-American legal history, will present the originalism debate among historians over influences on the framers of the Constitution by examining certain Virginian authors like St. George Tucker, who was an important early contributor to American legal thinking through his edited works on Blackstone’s Commentaries, and other
    authors who affected the debates over the Second Amendment.

    Joel Fishman, Coordinator and Moderator, Duquesne University Center for Legal Information, Allegheny County Law Library
    Warren M. Billings, University of New Orleans
    David T. Konig,Washington University

    LHRB-SIS Business Meeting

    5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

    Monday, July 10

    D-4 Promoting the Past to Assure the Future: The Lure of Legal History

    9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    As many of our traditional clientele increasingly rely upon electronic access to legal materials in their homes and offices,law librarians are seeking creative ways to reinvent their libraries’ services to attract and keep patrons. By digging into older materials in their collections and exploring the history of their institutions, they are unearthing fascinating subject matter to feature in exhibits, publications and educational programs. Not only scholars, but also judges, lawyers, students and the general public are using and appreciating the treasures in these collections. Law libraries are welcoming the public for tours, lectures and films, and are collaborating with court historical societies to recruit supporters. This program will discuss how to make these projects possible by expanding research skills and gaining expertise in the legal, political and cultural history of their states, localities and institutions so as to attract patrons.

    Carol D. Billings, Coordinator, Moderator and Speaker, Law Library of Louisiana
    Paul R. Baier, Louisiana State University, Paul M. Hebert Law Center
    Katherine I. Hedin, University of Minnesota Law Library
    Anne C. Peters, Social Law Library

    Tuesday, July 11

    LH&RB Roundtable: World of 1906

    11:45-a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
    Carol Billings, Beth Chamberlain, Stacy Etheredge, Lucinda Harrison-Cox, Kurt X. Metzmeier and Mark W. Podvia with discuss the culture, politics, current events, legal developments and sporting world of the year 1906. This presentation is open to everyone.

  • 2005 San Antonio, TX

    Sunday, July 17

    B-1: Deadwood: The Power of Film to Teach Foundations in Native American Treaty Law and U.S. Territorial Law (co-sponsored)

    2:45 p.m.

    B-2: Los Archivos de las Individualias: Judicial and Legislative Information from the Spanish Colonial Period in the United States

    2:45 p.m.

    Wednesday, July 20

    L-3: Values, Video and Vignettes: Using Video Oral History Techniques to Document the Unwritten Histories of AALL (co-sponsored)

    3:00 p.m.

  • 2004 Boston, MA

    Sunday, July 11

    LH&RB Roundtable: Dr. Morris Cohen discusses “Joseph Story and the Encyclopedia Americana”

    4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

    Monday, July 12

    D-4 Creating and Maintaining Legal History Collections: Collections Development and Analysis Issues for the Law Librarian

    4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

    In the last decade, a growing need has developed to establish legal history collections and provide substantive research in historical sources of the law. This program will address issues and concerns related to the needs of law libraries supporting legal history research and curricula, including formulating collections development policies for legal history programs, funding, material
    availability (e.g., rare books, out-of-print dealers), format availability (e.g., original, facsimile, electronic), and the benefits and drawbacks of original vs. other formats (e.g., English Reports on CD-ROM, Old Bailey Proceedings on the Web, 19th Century Legal Treatises in microform).

    Laura Anne Bedard, Coordinator and Speaker Georgetown University Law Center, Edward Bennett
    Williams Library
    Christopher Knott, Moderator Georgetown University Law Center, Edward Bennett Williams Library
    Karen S. Beck, Boston College Law Library
    Michael G. Chiorazzi, University of Arizona College of
    Law Library

    Handouts:

    LHRB-SIS Business Meeting July 12, 2003

    5:15 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.

    Tuesday, July 13

    Archivist Caucus

    7:30 p.m.

  • 2003 Seattle, WA

    Sunday, July 13

    LHRB-SIS Business Meeting

    11:45 a.m. 1:15 p.m.

    B-1: The Collision of Native American and Anglo-American Legal Concepts: A Legacy of the Louisiana Purchase

    1:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
    Level: Intermediate 75 Minutes
    Competency: Reference, Research and Patron Services
    Target Audience: Librarians, law professors, attorneys and historians involved with Native American law

    Learning Outcomes:

    • Participants will be able to compare several Native American and Anglo-American legal concepts.
    • Participants will be able to identify major resources of historical and current Indian law materials.

    The bicentennial of the Louisiana Purchase Treaty provides stimulus for the historical examination of the expansion of the United States. This acquisition brought enormous natural resources to the fledgling republic, but as the Anglo-American and Native American cultures collided, it forbade a new world for indigenous societies. This program will present a comparison review of Native American and Anglo-American legal concepts of sovereignty, property and riparian rights; discuss key court cases reflecting Native American legal concepts; and highlight historical and current materials available from major collections such as the National Indian Law Library.

    Laura Ray, Coordinator, Cleveland State University, Cleveland Marshall College of Law Library
    Robert Anderson, University of Washington, Native American Center and School of Law
    David Selden, National Indian Law Library/Native American Rights Fund

    Monday, July 14

    D-4: Creating and Maintaining Legal History Collections: Collections Development and Analysis Issues for the Law Librarian

    9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
    Level: Intermediate 60 Minutes
    Competency: Collection Care and Management
    Target Audience: Law librarians responsible for supporting faculty research and classes in legal history

    Learning Outcomes:

    • Participants will learn how to assess what belongs in a legal history collection, as well as what formats and general resources are available.
    • Participants will be able to identify the basic issues confronting law librarians in developing their legal history collections and supporting their legal history curricula.

    In the last decade, a growing need has developed to establish legal history collections and provide substantive research in historical sources of the law. This program will address issues and concerns related to the needs of law libraries supporting legal history research and curricula. Topics include formulating collections development policies for legal history programs, funding, material availability (e.g., rare books, out-of-print dealers), format availability (e.g., original, facsimile, electronic), as well as the benefits and drawbacks of original vs. other formats (e.g., English Reports on CD-ROM, Old Bailey Proceedings online, 19th Century Legal Treatises in microform).

    Laura Anne Bedard, Coordinator and Speaker, Georgetown University Law Center, Edward Bennett Williams Library
    Christopher Knott, Moderator, Georgetown University Law Center, Edward Bennett Williams Library
    Scott Pagel, George Washington University, Jacob Burns Law Library

    E-5: Researching and Writing Institutional History

    10:15 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
    Level: Intermediate 75 Minutes
    Competency: Reference, Research and Patron Services
    Target Audience: Legal historians, reference librarians, archivists and individuals with an interest in history

    Learning Outcomes:

    • Participants will be able to identify information sources and materials for use in writing the history of a library, law school, law firm or bar association.
    • Participants will learn specific problems and pitfalls to avoid in researching and writing such a history, including copyright issues, meeting deadlines and dealing with the presentation of conflicting information.

    Many law schools, bar associations and even law firms publish articles detailing their history, either as scholarly treatises or law review articles, or as alumni publications and bar journal articles. Law librarians can and should actively participate in the gathering and publication of such material. In this program, three librarians who have actively participated in such research and writing will review historical material they have prepared and suggest potential topics and sources, including state and local historical societies, alumni associations, yearbooks and directories. Problems and pitfalls to avoid will also be discussed.

    Mark Podvia, Coordinator, Moderator and Speaker, Dickinson School of Law Library, Pennsylvania State University
    Kurt X. Metzmeier, University of Louisville Law Library
    Regina L. Smith, Jenkins Law Library

    Tuesday, July 15

    LHRB-SIS Roundtable Meeting

    12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

  • 2002 Orlando, FL

    Sunday, July 21

    B-5: Legal History from the Reference Desk:Connecting the Past to Today’s Information Needs

    1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
    Kurt Metzmeier, Coordinator & Speaker, University of Louisville Law Library
    Katherine Topulos, Duke University School of Law Library

    Learning Outcomes:

    • Participants will formulate effective legal history search strategies and utilize legal history resources in English and American law.
    • Participants will identify standard state and federal legal history materials.

    No reference librarian is immune from an occasional foray into legal history research. Academic librarians are frequently asked to help research landmark cases and legal controversies. Firm and court librarians also must field historical questions from lawyers and judges preparing bar association talks, writing articles and looking for historical context for a brief or opinion. This program will familiarize librarians with legal history search strategies and resources, provide detailed information on English and American legal history research, as well as review tools particular to individual states and regions.

    Legal History and Rare Books SIS Business Meeting

    5:30 p.m.- 6:30 p.m.

    Tuesday, July 23

    Legal History and Rare Books SIS Roundtable Meeting

    12:15 p.m – 1:30 p.m.

    Wednesday, July 24

    K-2: Towards a Research Agenda for Legal History: Some Modest Proposals

    10:30 a.m. – 11:45 p.m.
    Katherine Hedin, Coordinator, University of Minnesota Law Library
    Karen Beck, Boston College Law Library
    Warren Billings, University of New Orleans

    Learning Outcomes:

    • Participants will identify possible research topics and strategies applicable to the formative period of American law.
    • Participants will describe trends in 19th century legal writing and publishing, demonstrate how those trends were instrumental in defining a distinctly American legal order, and illustrate how such an analysis can be applied to any area of the antebellum United States.

    Legal publishing during the formative period of American law (1776-1850) had a tremendous impact on the development of American law. A legal historian will analyze legal writing and publishing during this time and use specific examples to illustrate how this analysis can be applied to any place in the United States before the Civil War. A reference/rare books librarian will explain her research study focusing on the private libraries of early 19th century New England lawyers and will illustrate how this information sheds light on the practice of law and on legal education in the 19th century.

  • 2001 Minneapolis, MN

    Sunday, July 15

    Celebrating John Marshall: The 100th Anniversary of His Elevation to Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court.

    2:45 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
    Our major speaker will be Prof. Herbert A. Johnson, Ernest F. Hollings Professor of Constitutional Law at the University of South Carolina Law School. His talk will be on the 20″ Century Historiography of Chief Justice Marshall. Prof. Johnson was one of the co-editors of the John Marshall Papers, co-author with George Haskins of Fundamentals of Power: John Marshall 1801-1815, volume two of the Oliver Wendell Holmes Devise History of the United States Supreme Court; general editor of the well-received series on the Chief Justices of the United States Supreme Court including the volume on Marshall, and author of many articles in legal history. Joel Fishman will present a short paper on the law reports of the Marshall era. There will be time for questions at the end of the session.

    LHRB-SIS Business Meeting 

    5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

    Tuesday, July 17

    Legal Historical Materials in a Nutshell: An Introduction to Legal Archives and Manuscripts

    10:45 a.m.- 12:15 p.m.
    The moderator of the session will be Michael Widener, Archivist and Rare Books Librarian and Joseph D. Jamail Fellow in Law Librarianship at the University of Texas School of Law Tarlton Law Library, where he has worked since 1991. Panelists include William J. Maher, University Archivist and Professor of Library Administration at the University of lllinois, Urbana Champaign; Mark Lambert, Special Collections and Government Documents Librarian at the South Texas College of Law Library; and Paul Finkelman, the Chapman Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Tulsa College of Law.

    This session should interest not only archivists, manuscripts librarians, and legal historians, but also other librarians who must assist in maintaining and providing access to such collections. Other interested parties could include leaders of libraries that are considering starting an archives, libraries that have been approached by a prominent alumnus considering donating his papers to the library, or anyone who works at a library that includes such collections. Law library catalogers may find the session especially helpful, since it may shed some light on the peculiarities of these collections they must contend with in their libraries.

    LHRB-SIS Lunch Roundtable Meeting

    12:15 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.